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Middle East

  • Military History Magazine

    Is the IDF Invincible?

    Are the Israel Defense Forces really the world’s best army—or have they fought nothing but bush-league opponents? Commenting on the 19th century Confederation Helvetica, Austrian statesman Klemens von Metternich reportedly observed...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Battle of Gaza

    Following Alexander the Great’s death in 323 BC, his generals began fighting over the empire he had created. Within a decade two leading factions emerged. The first, led by the grizzled Macedonian veteran Antigonus the One-Eyed and his...

  • Military History Magazine

    Heist in Cherbourg

    How Israel’s cool-hand naval commandos stole five missile boats from a French shipyard—on Christmas Eve. When France imposed an arms embargo on Israel on the eve of the June 1967 Six-Day War, it marked an end to the Franco-Israeli...

  • Military History Magazine

    Indomitable Afghanistan

    Oft-called the “the Graveyard of Empires,” the wild region now known as Afghanistan has foiled would-be conquerors for millennia. In 1809 a diplomat named Mountstuart Elphinstone led Britain’s first fact-finding mission to...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: The Good Soldiers

    The Good Soldiers by David Finkel, Farrar, Straus and Giroux, New York, 2009, $26 This is the story of one Baghdad year in the life of an Army battalion under the leadership of Lt. Col. Ralph Kauzlarich. The year is April 2007 to April...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: In the Graveyard of Empires

    In the Graveyard of Empires: America’s War in Afghanistan by Seth G. Jones, W.W. Norton & Co., New York, 2009, $27.95 In Graveyard of Empires, Seth Jones points out that armies as capable as those of Alexander the Great found...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Arab Revolt

    In August 1917, Major T.E. Lawrence—the celebrated “Lawrence of Arabia”—penned a brief guide for British officers who would be assisting Arab forces in their ongoing revolt against the Ottoman Turks. Published in The Arab Bulletin,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Suez Smashup

    Soviet-backed Egypt fought U.S. ally Israel in a fierce three-year proxy battle now known as the War of Attrition. The opening clash in the three-year War of Attrition came just three weeks after the end of the Six-Day War, when Egyptian...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from Omdurman

    Following the 1885 fall of Khartoum and death of Maj. Gen. Charles George “Chinese” Gordon, the British resolved to deal with the Mahdi army in the Sudan. Finally, in the fall of 1898, Maj. Gen. Sir Herbert Kitchener led 8,200 British...

  • American History Magazine

    Encounter: FDR Dines With King Ibn Saud

    On the deck of the destroyer USS Murphy, the bearded king perched on his gilded throne, surrounded by gorgeous oriental carpets and fierce barefoot bodyguards carrying daggers and swords. Nearby, on the ship’s fantail, the king’s sheep...

  • World War II Magazine

    Pirates of the Sand Seas

    How a group of gentleman explorers became Britain’s legendary Long Range Desert Group. MAJ. RALPH A. BAGNOLD sat before the commander of British forces in the Middle East. He watched nervously as Gen. Archibald Wavell picked up the note...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Suez Crisis

    The nine-day Suez Crisis of 1956 was sparked by a series of what in hindsight seem playground-worthy disputes, though they could have led to global Armageddon. That year Egypt switched its allegiance from Western arms suppliers to the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The 27-Day War

    Just a month after 9/11 a handful of CIA men and U.S. Special Forces soldiers in Afghanistan—backed by cavalry, cash, and airstrikes—toppled the Taliban. At dusk on September 19, 2001, eight days after al-Qaeda’s 9/11 attack claimed...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Napoleon’s Desert Storm

    Why Western armies win battles— but not wars—in the Muslim world. Crimson and azure robes embroidered with silver and gold flashed in the hot Egyptian sun as 7,000 Mamluk cavalry trotted toward the invaders, Napoleon Bonaparte’s Army...

  • MHQ Magazine

    A Short History of United Nations Peacekeeping

    For more than four decades, the Blue Helmets have carved out an impressive, and often overlooked, role for themselves monitoring cease-fire agreements, disarming rebel groups, and preserving law and order in troubled lands. The decrepit...

  • HistoryNet

    War and Peace: 2013 and Beyond

    What readers must know about the global strategic situation. EDITOR’S NOTE: Author John Sutherland is a senior operations and intelligence analyst whose influential articles include the widely acclaimed “iGuerrilla: The New Model...