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  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms and Men: Flammenwerfer!

    “The Prince of Hades” introduced a terrifying new weapon to World War I battlefields. The small groups of gray-clad soldiers dis- mounted from wagons on February 26, 1915, and trudged under cover of darkness across the shell-cratered...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Greek Tragedy: Invading Greece in WWII

    While Mussolini’s two attempts to invade Greece were farcical and the Nazis had to finish the job, the campaigns ultimately proved disastrous for every country involved. In the autumn of 1940, Benito Mussolini was a frustrated would-be...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Taking Tarragona

    In 1811, General Louis-Gabriel Suchet sought his marshal’s baton in the breach of a Spanish fortress. On the sweltering afternoon of Friday, June 28, 1811, French engineers surveyed the 10-meter- wide breach in the wall surrounding...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Chaco War 1932-1935: Battle in the Barrens

    Bolivia’s obscure war with Paraguay showcased the modern weapons and tactics that would become so familiar in the upcoming world war. From 1932 to 1935 Bolivia and Paraguay were locked in a savage struggle that produced the bloodiest but...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Fisherman: Catching Spartacus

    A Roman general sets his nets to catch Spartacus at Bruttium. It was a winter morning in the mountains of southern Italy, in early 71 BC. Normally it was silent at this time of year, when even the herdsmen had left for lower ground. On...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Laos: The Road to Vietnam

    In 1959 the United States was drawn inexorably into a local conflict in a tiny Asian kingdom, relying on secret armies, Cold War tactics, and a vast underestimation of the enemy. Sound familiar? Almost 60,000 Americans died in the Vietnam...

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    England by Sea, Land, and Air

    A young U.S. Marine lieutenant survived a perilous 1943 sea journey to get a taste of wartime England and bone up on a newfangled technology called radar. In 1943 I was a newly minted first lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps and a...

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    Ask MHQ: German U-boats on the Shore

    Q: In addition to attacking shipping, why didn’t German U-boats surface and shell military or civilian targets on shore? James Goodwin Lake Ridge, Va. A: German and Japanese submarines did halfheartedly attack American land targets....

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    MHQ Letters from Readers- Summer 2009

    Naming Names in 1812 I have to question the use of the term “Republican” to describe the U.S. congressional majority party of 1812, more commonly called the Democratic-Republicans in Stephen Budiansky’s “Giant Killer,” Spring...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: The White War

    The White War: Life and Death on the Italian Front, 1915–1919  By Mark Thompson. 454 pp. Basic Books, 2009 $35.00  “The First World War is a mystery,” writes historian John Keegan. “Why did a prosperous continent, at the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: The Gamble

    The Gamble: General David Petraeus and the American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2006–2008  By Thomas Ricks. 394 pp. Penguin Press, 2009 $27.95 In 2006, Thomas Ricks, a reporter for The Washington Post, published Fiasco, a scathing...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artists at War: Women in War

    Western art of the last 500 years illustrates the diverse roles women have played in times of conflict. The modern idea of women in war conjures images of combat, with women serving and sometimes dying in an arena long considered the sole...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Reinventing the Battlefield

    America’s Civil War featured heavy rifle fire and entrenched combatants while the cavalry and artillery played subordinate roles. Battle was the defining characteristic of the American Civil War. Some authorities count as many as 10,000...

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    Burning Falmouth

    In 1775, the Royal Navy’s cruel attack backfired, spurring on the American colonies’ nascent rebellion. By the autumn of 1775, the six-month- old American Revolution had already devolved into a stalemate, at least on land. Maj. Gen....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Gall’s Last Stand

    The Lakota Sioux chief earned his reputation as a fierce warrior and tactical genius at Killdeer Mountain, the battles of the Yellowstone, and Little Bighorn. But what role, if any, did he really play in Custer’s final act? On June 25,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Reaching for the Sky

    After breaking records and gender barriers in the Luftwaffe, two female pilots compete to change history—one to ensure Hitler’s success, the other his doom. Controversy stalked the 1936 Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. Germany had...