Historical Figures Archives | Page 4 of 137 | HistoryNet MENU

Historical Figures

  • Military History Magazine

    Last Stand at Ely

    After the 1066 Norman conquest an alliance of English rebels held out on the swamp-ringed isle of Ely— but William would not be denied. On Oct. 14, 1066, the Norman- French army defeated the English at the Battle of Hastings. Harold II,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Wallowing in Courage: 6th U.S. Cavalry

    6th U.S. Cavalry Medals of Honor Washita River, Texas September 12, 1874 During the Red River War, Colonel Nelson A. Miles, commanding a U.S. Army column against renegade Indians in the Texas Panhandle, sent four enlisted men—Sergeant...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Poets of Hell

    These few Englishmen described the brutal realities of the trenches, not as effete observers but as participants, fellow men-at-arms in the Great War. In April 1917 British army 2nd Lt. Wilfred Owen of the 5th Battalion, Manchester...

  • Military History Magazine

    Bankrolling the French

    In 1938 a shadowy group of Frenchmen approached treasury secretary Henry Morgenthau Jr. about purchasing U.S. combat aircraft. Following its enactment in March 1941 the Lend-Lease Program provided American war materiel to Allied nations...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from Manila Bay, 1898

    In 1890 naval strategist Alfred Thayer Mahan wrote, “When the opportunities for gain abroad are understood, the course of American enterprise will cleave a channel by which to reach them.” In the late 19th century, explained Mahan, the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Shaka Zulu: Africa’s Napoleon?

    The warrior-king was a loyal son, a fearsome fighter, and master tactician, a ruthless tyrant, a national-hero—and in the end largely the stuff of myth. He came out of nowhere to lead his people to greatness. But while Shaka Zulu has...

  • Military History Magazine

    Letters from Readers- Military History August 2014

    History’s Worst Weapons Re. “10 of History’s Worst Weapons, by Stephan Wilkinson, May: I was somewhat surprised to see that the Mark 14 torpedo made the list. As a young man of 18 I enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1976. After recruit...

  • Military History Magazine

    Allenby Captures Jerusalem

    The British General’s muted entry through the Jaffa Gate as the tidewater moment in his well-conceived and hard-fought campaign for Palestine. In June 1917, amid another round of distressing news from the Western Front, British Prime...

  • Military History Magazine

    Sideshow on the Danube

    Kutuzov has spent most of military career fighting the Turks. On April 1, 1811, one-eyed General Mikhail Illarionovich Kutuzov arrived in Bucharest to take command of Russia’s army in Moldavia and Wallachia. An exhausting and indecisive...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hero of ’64 and ’74: Frank D. Baldwin

    Frank D. Baldwin U.S. Army Medals of Honor Civil War & Indian wars Frank Dwight Baldwin, whose four-decade Army career spanned from the Civil War through the Spanish-American War, was recommended for the Medal of Honor three times and...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: The Bishop’s Boys, by Tom Crouch

    The Bishop’s Boys: A Life of Wilbur and Orville Wright by Tom Crouch On the 110th anniversary of their immortal flights at Kitty Hawk, it seems appropriate to go back to stuff we might have missed the first—or second or third—time we...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: Air Commanders

    Air Commanders edited by John Andreas Olsen, Potomac Books, Washington, D.C., 2012, $45  The U.S. Air Force and its predecessor organizations have been blessed with some extraordinarily fine leaders, men of competence, integrity and...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Perfect Wing, Who Designed It?

    Did an obscure German welder in Anthony Fokker’s employ, rather than the Dutch aviation pioneer himself, design the world’s first truly modern wing? Historians have long disagreed about Anthony Fokker’s role in the design of his...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    ‘Foredoomed to Failure’: An Attempt to Fly Around the World

    An ill-prepared British crew set out in 1922 on the first-ever attempt to fly around the world. In August 1922, the crew of a steam launch plucked two exhausted and half-starved British airmen from the Bay of Bengal. The fliers had endured...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Boyington’s Bastards

    From Marine Corps orphans to top-scoring fighter pilots, the fabled Black Sheep followed pugnacious “Pappy” Boyington to fame. It was one of the biggest air raids in the entire campaign for the Solomon Islands. More than a year after...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Safe and Useful Airplane

    As Allied fighters fell in droves to the Germans during “Bloody April” 1917, Orville Wright predicted that airplanes would render war obsolete. Little more than a decade before the terrible slaughter and devastation that defined World...