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Historical Figures

  • MHQ Magazine

    Interview with Antulio J. Echevarria II

    In his newly published analysis of how the United States has, throughout its history, waged war—Reconsidering the American Way of War—retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel Antulio J. Echevarria II confronts a significant disconnect...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Book Review: Give Me a Fast Ship

    Give Me a Fast Ship: The Continental Navy and America’s Revolution at Sea  By Tim McGrath. 560 pages. NAL Caliber, 2014. $26.95 Yes, there really was a naval component to the American Revolution, but it was by no means well...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Curse of Cromwell

    His soldiering was ruthless, brilliant, and backed by faith. At the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642 an unheralded military genius was waiting in the wings. Oliver Cromwell, already past 40 years old when he first took up arms,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Irregular Warfare: Strength of Weakness

    How legends of T. E. Lawrence’s guerrilla forces in Arabia and Orde Wingate’s Chindit special ops in Burma fatally beguiled the French at Dien Bien Phu. Historians interpret the May 1954 fall of the French fortress at Dien Bien Phu to,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Laws of War: TR’s 1905 Treaty of Portsmouth

    The night of February 8–9, 1904, Japan launched a damaging surprise attack on the Russian fleet moored at Port Arthur, Manchuria, heralding the opening of the Russo-Japanese War. For the next two years a rising, rapidly modernizing...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Book Review: Misalliance by Edward Miller

    Misalliance: Ngo Dinh Diem, the United States, and the Fate of South Vietnam  by Edward Miller, Harvard University Press, 2013 On Nov. 2, 1963, the president of the Republic of Vietnam, Ngo Dinh Diem, and his brother and closest...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Giap’s Second Masterpiece

    Long-held beliefs that the Tet Offensive was intended to produce a single-stroke victory are challenged by new insights into one of the 20th century’s most astute military commanders. General Vo Nguyen Giap understood very early in the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    From the Bulge to Tet

    Brigadier General Albin F. Irzyk played a significant role in two of America’s most famous battles. The frozen, bitterly cold forest in Europe during a major World War II offensive and the steamy South Vietnamese capital city at the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Letter from the Editor- Vietnam February 2014

    A Worthy Opponent General Vo Nguyen Giap, who died in Hanoi on October 4 at age 102, evoked a wide range of emotions from opponents and compatriots alike, but ambivalence was not among them. To some he was a reviled butcher willing to...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Intel- Vietnam Magazine February 2014

    Crowds Mourn General Giap Tens of thousands of Vietnamese from all provinces of the country flooded into Hanoi when word came of General Vo Nguyen Giap’s death at age 102 on Oct. 4, 2013, at Military Hospital 108, where he had spent the...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    1964: Misread Signals, Lost Opportunities

    New insights—from intelligence archives of the United States and North Vietnam—highlight the genesis 50 years ago of a flawed strategy. Had President Lyndon B. Johnson, advisers and intelligence services not disregarded, rejected,...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Man Who Knew No Fear: General Lucian K. Truscott

    Lucian K. Truscott Jr. had a voice like gravel, a brain for combat, and a heartfelt grasp of the soldiering life...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Book Review: Westmoreland’s War

    Westmoreland’s War: Reassessing American Strategy in Vietnam, by Gregory A. Daddis, Oxford University Press, 2014 Addressing the seemingly dogged entanglement in South Vietnam with General William Westmoreland, Brig. Gen. Willard...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    North Vietnam’s Big-Unit War and the Man Behind It

    A fierce advocate of offensive battles using large forces, Communist leader Le Duan shaped military strategy throughout the war. In December 1964, the Viet Cong, famous for their hit-and-run guerrilla tactics, overran villages in four...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Grinding to a Halt

    South Vietnam’s 1971 invasion of Laos to cut NVA supply routes was supposed to be a showcase for Nixon’s plan to decrease American involvement in the war, but that all changed when Operation Lam Son 719 came … IN EARLY 1971,...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    The Vinh Window and the Ho Chi Minh Trail

    Code-breakers enabled U.S. spies to peer into the communications centers of the North Vietnamese, but then problems arose. THROUGHOUT MUCH OF THE WAR, AMERICAN code-breakers intercepted North Vietnam- ese radio transmissions of planned...