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Historical Conflicts


Clay Allison: ‘Good-Natured Holy Terror’

Sharon Cunningham | Published: July 30, 2013 at 2:47 pm
How much trouble he ever caused in Texas is debatable, and during his time in Colfax County, New Mexico Territory, Clay Allison mostly did his fighting for a cause

Interview With Historian Paul Lee Johnson

Johnny D. Boggs | Published: July 30, 2013 at 1:23 pm
In his new book The McLaurys in Tombstone, Arizona: An O.K. Corral Obituary, author Paul Lee Johnson examines the little-known McLaury side of the October 1881 gunfight near the O.K. Corral.

Book Review: Wyatt Earp, by Andrew C. Isenberg

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 30, 2013 at 11:36 am
Andrew Isenberg presents compelling arguments about celebrated lawman Wyatt Earp's flawed character, but he falls short of proving his premise that Earp led a vigilante life.

Air Cav: How Soldiers in the Sky Reshaped Combat on the Ground

Joseph Abodeely | Published: July 24, 2013 at 4:07 pm
In the Vietnam War, adapting old principles of traditional cavalry to the new capabilities of the helicopter created an unprecedented fighting force

Lucky Break

Robert M. Citino | Published: July 15, 2013 at 1:51 pm
I've been thinking a lot lately about the endgame of the war in the European Theater, early 1945. For the Germans, things had fallen apart. The Soviets were slashing deeply into East Prussia and crossing the Oder. The western allies …

Interview With War of 1812 Author Steve Vogel

Published: July 03, 2013 at 5:24 pm
In his new book Through the Perilous Fight, author Steve Vogel looks at the six weeks in 1814 that proved critical in the United States' follow-up war with Britain.

Book Review: Bunker Hill, by Nathaniel Philbrick

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 03, 2013 at 4:37 pm
Nathaniel Philbrick explores the pivotal Battle of Bunker Hill and how Bostonians set the tone for the remainder of the American Revolution.

Book Review: The Plantagenets, by Dan Jones

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 03, 2013 at 3:22 pm
In his new book The Plantagenets, Dan Jones relates the turbulent history of the medieval house that ruled England and much of France for more than 250 years.

Why Rome Fell

Richard A. Gabriel | Published: July 03, 2013 at 2:30 pm
The vast empire that reigned supreme for more than two millennia crumbled in just a few short centuries

Korean War 60th Anniversary Programs - Col. David J. Clark Interview

Gerald D. Swick | Published: June 11, 2013 at 7:06 pm
July 27, 2013, marks the 60th anniversary of the negotiated armistice that ended hostilities in the Korean War, a war that began June 25, 1950, when communist North Korea invaded democratic South Korea. It was a war that claimed an …

The Battle of Rosebud, A to Z

John Flood | Published: May 31, 2013 at 12:37 pm
The Battle of the Rosebud pitted the vaunted warrior Crazy Horse against the greatest Indian fighter the U.S. Army had at the time—that is, Crook not Custer

Elco PT Boat: 80 Feet of Wood and Weaponry

Jon Guttman | Published: May 01, 2013 at 4:22 pm
Of the nearly 400 fast, light and heavily armed patrol boats Elco made for the U.S. Navy during World War II, a few achieved notoriety and one survives today as a museum ship.

The Making of General Winfield Scott

Ron Soodalter | Published: May 01, 2013 at 4:05 pm
The young officer survived court-martial, a duel and the War of 1812 to become one of America’s greatest commanders

Book Review: Invisible Armies, by Max Boot

HistoryNet Staff | Published: May 01, 2013 at 3:39 pm
Invisible Armies, by author-historian Max Boot, is an authoritative and superbly written examination of the evolution of guerrilla warfare and its close cousin, terrorism.

Book Review: The Zimmermann Telegram, by Thomas Boghardt

HistoryNet Staff | Published: May 01, 2013 at 3:38 pm
In his new book historian Thomas Boghardt examines just what impact the Zimmerman Telegram had on America's decision to formally enter into World War I.

Why Anvil Gets No Respect

Robert M. Citino | Published: April 16, 2013 at 10:07 am
Last time out, I wrote about a forgotten campaign: the Allied landing in the south of France in August 1944. The planners first called it Operation Anvil, then renamed it Dragoon just days before it took place. By any accounting, …
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