Historical Conflicts Archives | Page 3 of 125 | HistoryNet MENU

Historical Conflicts

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Showdown on South Mountain

    Pennsylvania was Robert E. Lee’s target in September 1862. But Maryland and George McClellan got in the way. On September 13, 1862, Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia was dangerously divided—stretched all the way from...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    The Burning in Shenandoah Valley

    Phil Sheridan determined to show the rebels a hot time in the Shenandoah Valley. Philip Sheridan surveyed his awful handwork with satisfaction. Plumes of black smoke smudged the Shenandoah Valley’s fairytale landscape of rolling green...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Capture of Guînes

    Medieval sieges were arduous and expensive. Besieging armies had to be fed and paid, and the drawn-out process sapped military strength that could be used for more glorious battles. To circumvent a fortified town or castle’s defenses was...

  • Military History Magazine

    A Day of Blizzard and Blood

    The crown was at stake when, on a late winter day in 1461, two rival armies clashed in the bloodies battle on English soil. England’s Wars of the Roses were two struggles in one. The first was a feud between the houses of Lancaster...

  • Military History Magazine

    The U.S. Marines’ Mythic Fight at Belleau Wood

    Piercing the fog of war to separate legend from fact. Many historians consider the June 1918 Battle of Belleau Wood the defining event in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps. As the Corps’ first large-scale engagement, this World War I...

  • Military History Magazine

    Napoléon: What Made Him Great?

    A talented combat leader, the diminutive emperor was also a shrewd judge of human nature. President Harry S. Truman once defined a leader as “a man who has the ability to get other people to do what they don’t want to do, and like...

  • Military History Magazine

    Decisions: Napoléon’s Dash to Jena

    No general in history has a greater reputation for decisiveness than Napoléon Bonaparte. As a military leader he was the consummate man of action. He outthought contemporaries, not just in breadth of knowledge but by the lightning...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Italo-Ethiopian War

    Conventional wisdom holds that the Spanish Civil War was the dress rehearsal for World War II, yet a far more important, earlier and lesser-known conflict (it had no Picasso to paint a Guernica) was the Italo-Ethiopian War of 1935–36....

  • Military History Magazine

    India’s Blitzkrieg

    India’s army dished out its own style of ‘Lightning War’ to free a nation. When we think about modern war, we tend to think of the Western world. After all, modern wars require global reach, mass armies and high technology, and only...

  • Military History Magazine

    Nelson: What Made Him Great?

    Boldness, genius and a rare willingness to risk all in pursuit of victory. Few would disagree that Great Britain’s Vice Admiral Lord Horatio Nelson (1758–1805) was a great naval leader. Indeed, many historians consider him the...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Balkanized War

    In World War II Yugoslavia the Axis invasion unleashed age-old hatreds and sparked brutal internecine strife. In January 1943 the German army launched a major offensive, codenamed Fall Weiss (“Case White”), to encircle an area in...

  • Military History Magazine

    Decisions: Roman Folly at Edessa

    Treachery has often had a decisive impact on military operations. Great generals have founded tactical and even strategic plans upon it—and with good reason. Assassinations, betrayals and defections, if timed properly, can turn the...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Falklands War

    It was a brief but violent war that baffled Americans, drove Britons to an ecstasy of patriotism and totally blindsided the Argentines. For 150 years Argentina and Great Britain had contested sovereignty over the Falklands and South...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Bois des Caures, Verdun, France

    At 0715 on Feb. 21, 1916, German artillery started a nine-hour preparatory bombardment of the French fortress city of Verdun. When the shelling ended, lead elements of the VII Reserve Corps and the XVIII Army Corps quickly reached the...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Persian Fallacy

    In the hit fantasy action film 300 the valiant Greeks defending the pass at Thermopylae in 480 BC are portrayed as the epitome of heroic manliness. Their Persian opponents, on the other hand, are depicted as effeminate slaves led by...

  • Military History Magazine

    Decisions: Crossing the Andes

    Feats of brilliance and finesse have distinguished military history’s finest commanders and inspired many of their decisive victories. Often, however, it is the fundamental qualities of endurance and strength that matter most. In...