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Historical Conflicts

  • Military History Magazine

    The Last Hero: William J. Donovan

    William J. Donovan U.S. Army Medal of Honor Landres-et-Saint Georges, France October 14 and 15, 1918 William Joseph Donovan was one of the very few American soldiers to have received the U.S. Army’s three highest decorations: the Medal...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from the Bay of Pigs, 1961

    The epitaph for the disastrous April 17–19, 1961, attempt to overthrow communist dictator Fidel Castro by invading Cuba with 1,500 amateur soldiers and a handful of piston-engined B-26 ground-attack bombers was spoken soon afterward by...

  • Military History Magazine

    Dodging a Bullet: The Indian Rebellion

    The Indian Rebellion of 1857 was doomed to fail, but the religious and cultural tensions it inflamed would ultimately topple the British raj. On May 9, 1857, some 4,000 British soldiers and sepoys—native Indian troops—formed a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Last Stand at Ely

    After the 1066 Norman conquest an alliance of English rebels held out on the swamp-ringed isle of Ely— but William would not be denied. On Oct. 14, 1066, the Norman- French army defeated the English at the Battle of Hastings. Harold II,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Wallowing in Courage: 6th U.S. Cavalry

    6th U.S. Cavalry Medals of Honor Washita River, Texas September 12, 1874 During the Red River War, Colonel Nelson A. Miles, commanding a U.S. Army column against renegade Indians in the Texas Panhandle, sent four enlisted men—Sergeant...

  • Military History Magazine

    Treachery in Tripoli

    When Muslim Mamluk Egypt targeted this crusader state in 1289, the Christian were too busy infighting to heed. It is 1289, in the waning years of the Christian Crusader states in the Middle East. The preeminent Muslim power of the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Rush to Disaster: Task Force Smith

    Sent to delay the North Korean communist wave at the outset of the Korean War, Task Force Smith became an object lesson in military hubris. There should be, somewhere in the annals of American military history, a compendium of battlefield...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Highest Recognition: Private Johnson Beharry

    Private Johnson Beharry British Army Victoria Cross Al ‘Ama¯rah, Iraq May 1 and June 11, 2004 “Some days you the bug, some days you the windshield,” was the way Caribbean-born British army Private Johnson Beharry put it. In Iraq he...

  • Military History Magazine

    Mexico’s Irish Army

    Seeking to escape ignoble lives in their homeland, Irishmen of the Saint Patrick’s Battalion risked the hangman’s rope to fight in the Mexican War. On the morning of Sept. 10, 1847, as dawn broke over the Mexican village of San Ángel,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Taking Crimea… Again

    Armies from antiquity to the present day have wrangled over this patch of ground in the Black Sea but why? The three key principles of the real estate business, the saying goes, are “location, location, location.” The style of a home,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Letter from Military History- August 2014

    The Certainty of War Armed conflict has always been—and, sadly, will continue to be —a recurring theme in human society. Whether comprising clashes between rival clans of hunter-gatherers, nascent city-states or multinational...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from the Rebel Raiders

    Among the Confederacy’s most successful responses to the Anaconda Plan—the Union’s Civil War strategy to blockade Southern ports and simultaneously advance down the Mississippi River to cut the Confederacy in two—was guerre de...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Columbus, New Mexico

    In the predawn darkness of March 9, 1916, several hundred armed Mexican horsemen crossed the border into the United States to attack the unsuspecting garrison town of Columbus, N.M. What ensued, just 3 miles north of the boundary, was a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Bloody Culloden, 1746

    This close-quarters clash on a windswept moor would challenge the Scottish clan tradition and direct the course of British rule. On a frigid, rainy day in mid-April, on a windswept, boggy moor five miles east of Inverness, Scotland, some...

  • Military History Magazine

    Allenby Captures Jerusalem

    The British General’s muted entry through the Jaffa Gate as the tidewater moment in his well-conceived and hard-fought campaign for Palestine. In June 1917, amid another round of distressing news from the Western Front, British Prime...

  • Military History Magazine

    Sideshow on the Danube

    Kutuzov has spent most of military career fighting the Turks. On April 1, 1811, one-eyed General Mikhail Illarionovich Kutuzov arrived in Bucharest to take command of Russia’s army in Moldavia and Wallachia. An exhausting and indecisive...