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Historical Conflicts

  • HistoryNet

    Letter from the Editor- Armchair General March 2015

    “Everybody loves a winner,” as the saying goes, and we typically celebrate the victorious commanders and their triumphant armies, navies or air forces. But how should we judge those that fought on the losing side– military...

  • HistoryNet, Reviews

    Book Review: Valley of the Shadow

    Valley of the Shadow  by Ralph Peters (Forge Books, 2015) Ralph Peters once again superbly demonstrates his complete mastery of the craft of writing historical fiction. Valley of the Shadow joins his previous prize-winning novels on the...

  • HistoryNet

    Israel’s War of Independence, 1948: You Take Command

    As Major Moshe Dayan, YOU must lead your outnumbered Israeli defenders to defeat a powerful Arab attack. On November 29, 1947, the United Nations passed Resolution 181, authorizing the termination of the quarter-century-old League of...

  • World War II Magazine

    Game Review: Escape from Colditz

    World War II's resident gamer Chris Ketcherside reviews Osprey Games' reissue of a classic....

  • HistoryNet

    Dispatches- May 2015

    Civil War Hero Receives Medal of Honor After 151 years, Union artillery Lieutenant Alonzo H. Cushing has been recognized for his heroism above and beyond the call of duty at the 1863 Civil War Battle of Gettysburg. President Barack Obama...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Culture: Eyewitness to Glory

    A merchant captain turned marine painter, Nicholas Pocock captured the ferocity of the British-French fight on the “Glorious First of June.” On June 1, 1794, British artist Nicholas Pocock witnessed the first important naval battle of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Hope is Not a Strategy: Germany’s Last Best Shot at Victory

    Early in 1918 the German High Command decided on a plan for a major campaign to win World War I by driving the British Expeditionary Force off the Continent and shattering the Allied coalition before fresh American troops arrived. But the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    When Did Warfare Begin?

    Archaeology, evolution, and the evidence of early human conflict When did humans begin to kill humans? Or more precisely, when did groups of humans learn to cooperate to kill members of other groups? The debate on this subject is old and...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Tanks that Mattered

    For the past century, in single combat and in wars, these landmark tanks have been arbiters of victory and defeat. The tank was the glamour weapon of 20th-century warfare, combining mobility, armor, and firepower into one deadly package....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: The Durham Boat

    Originally built to carry heavy cargo on colonial waterways, Durham boats became General George Washington’s landing craft of choice in late 1776. For the most renowned river crossing in American history— General George Washington’s...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Laws of War: Uniting a Fractious Greece

    Philip II, in his 20s when he ascended the throne of Macedon in 359 B.C., had ambitious ideas for his backward realm at the edge of the feuding city-states of Greece. Under his rule, Macedonian nobles grew richer and understood that the...

  • World War II Magazine

    Let There Be Light: How a Film on PTSD Worried the Army

    Aiming to illuminate an invisible combat injury, a groundbreaking film became a casualty itself...

  • World War II Magazine

    Footlocker: Clash of the Elites–A Mysterious Helmet

    Curators at the National World War II Museum solve a reader's question about a mysterious WWII Japanese naval helmet with writing on it....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Making Art of Atrocity

     In the wake of World War I, American artist George Bellows “had to draw them”—the works in his War Series. The swift advance of German armies through Belgium and northern France in the opening weeks of the First World War...

  • World War II Magazine

    Battle Films: Elegy for the Lost

    Battle Films columnist Mark Grimsley explores how a Japanese anime film reflected the emotions of wartime Japanese society...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    One Man’s Tet

    Jan Patronek, a young U.S. Army lieutenant, finds himself leading South Vietnamese troops in house-to-house fighting with the Viet Cong during the 1968 Tet Offensive. Sentries standing guard at 3 a.m. in the Mekong Delta initially assumed...