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France

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Colonial Good Life

    The Colonial Good Life: A Commentary on Andre Joyeux’s Vision of French Indochina translated, introduced and annotated by Michael G. Vann and Joel Montague. White Lotus Press, 2008. French artist Andre Joyeux served as an art teacher in...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Making of Marlborough

    John Churchill rose from modest means to become first Duke of Marlborough and the greatest general of his time. On the morning of August 13, 1704, an English general stood on a low hill overlooking a nondescript Bavarian village on the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Heist in Cherbourg

    How Israel’s cool-hand naval commandos stole five missile boats from a French shipyard—on Christmas Eve. When France imposed an arms embargo on Israel on the eve of the June 1967 Six-Day War, it marked an end to the Franco-Israeli...

  • Military History Magazine

    Tombs of Memory

    The cultured French town of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, France, is steeped in history—the more recent of which residents would rather forget...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Between Collaboration and Resistance

    Between Collaboration and Resistance: French Literary Life Under Nazi Occupation  At the New York Public Library (nypl.org), Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, New York, New York, through July 25, 2009.  Powerful, evocative, nuanced,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    1914: Marne in the Balance

    France very nearly failed to repulse Germany’s mammoth initial invasion. But it did, leading to a slaughterous long-term war of attrition. The Battle of the Marne was a close-run thing. It confirmed the elder Helmuth von Moltke’s...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Another Contemptible Little Army?

    It’s a cardinal sin of warfare to underestimate the enemy, but Germany did exactly that as it sized up U.S. military power in World War I...

  • Military History Magazine

    Verdun: Tale of Two Forts

    The German troops who swarmed over two key French fortresses protecting Verdun anticipated a tough fight. They were only half right. When the German army attacked Verdun, France, on Feb. 21, 1916, it ran up against a ring of 18 large forts...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: Broadway’s Fighting Priest

    Lt. Col. Francis P. Duffy U.S. Army DSC, DSM, Légion d’honneur, Croix de guerre France, 1918 Only two men are honored with life-sized statues in New York’s Times Square, epicenter of the American theater industry. The statue on the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Vimy Ridge, France

    Vimy Ridge is far more than just another bloody World War I battle or the site of a marvelously preserved battlefield. Though it lies in France, Canadians justly consider it the birthplace of their nation. From April 9 to 12, 1917, the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Secrets of Overlord

    The problem was not just to fool the Germans about where the D-Day landings would take place, but to persuade them that normandy was merely a diversion...

  • American History Magazine

    Encounter: Sam Houston Meets Alexis de Tocqueville

    Sam Houston’s wife left him 10 weeks after their wedding in 1829 and returned to her rich father’s plantation. Houston, who was 36 years old and governor of Tennessee at the time, wrote a rambling letter to his father-in-law that...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Experience | Over the Top

    Frustrated by his own country’s neutrality in the early years of World War I, Arthur Guy Empey traveled to London and enlisted in the British Army. Soon he was in the trenches on the Western Front...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned From…The Haitian Revolution

    Surprisingly, the drums signaling for a cease-fire from the French bastion at Vertières penetrated the chaos of battle on the Caribbean colony of Saint-Domingue. General Donatien-Marie-Joseph de Vimeur, vicomte de Rochambeau, had just...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Classic Dispatches | The Great Exodus

    Cowles detailed her experiences as a war correspondent in her first book, "Looking for Trouble," published in 1941, from which the narrative that follows is excerpted...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Other Dunkirk

    Even as the famous flotilla departed France, British general Archie Beauman was conjuring up his own miracle hundreds of miles to the south. Brig. Gen. Archibald Bentley Beauman, taking stock of his troops’ situation in northern France...