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Foreign Affairs

  • American History Magazine

    Encounter: Churchill and Stalin Charm Truman

    “I am getting ready see Stalin and Churchill,” Harry Truman wrote in a to go letter to his mother in July 1945. “I have to take my tuxedo, tails, Negro preacher coat, high hat, low hat and hard hat….Wish I didn’t have to go.”...

  • American History Magazine

    The First Cherry Trees in Washington

    For 100 years, District of Columbia residents have reveled in a glorious rite of spring: the blossoming of thousands of cherry trees, a gift of friendship from the people of Japan. Tokyo mayor Yukio Ozaki donated 3,020 trees to first lady...

  • American History Magazine

    Encounter: John Adams’ Bow to King George III

    John Paris in April 1785, serving as an American diplomat, when ADAMS WAS LIVING near he received a letter announcing that he’d been appointed the first ambassador from the United States to Great Britain. Adams had lobbied to get that...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII DVD Review: The Road to World War II

    The Road to World War II   Directed by Scott Garen, 1978. 6 hours on six discs. $49.99.  In 1978, PBS aired 12 half-hour episodes of Between the Wars, which covered the fraught ground between the Treaty of Versailles and the...

  • HistoryNet

    War and Peace: 2013 and Beyond

    What readers must know about the global strategic situation. EDITOR’S NOTE: Author John Sutherland is a senior operations and intelligence analyst whose influential articles include the widely acclaimed “iGuerrilla: The New Model...

  • HistoryNet

    The Devil’s Agreement

    Through the 1939 Nazi-Soviet Pact, cynical dictators paved the way for World War II in Europe. In Moscow’s Kremlin late on Au- gust 23, 1939, Soviet dictator Josef Stalin stood in the background beaming proudly as his foreign...

  • HistoryNet

    Crisis Watch- Trust Isn’t a Strategy

    False allies betray our interests abroad. President Ronald Reagan had it right: “Trust, but verify.” Which, if you think about, means: “Don’t trust them at all.” In dealing with states we’ve convinced ourselves are allies –...

  • HistoryNet

    The Forest Brothers Against the Soviets

    From 1944-53, Lithuanian partisans risked their lives to oppose repressive Soviet occupation. From the end of World War II through the early years of the Cold War, thousands of Lithuania’s sons and a few of its daughters disappeared into...

  • HistoryNet

    Failed Peace: The Treaty of Versailles, 1919

    What “everyone knows” about the infamous treaty ending World War I is wrong! Although we typically think of November 11, 1918, as the end date of World War I, that day only marked the start of an armistice ending the actual fighting,...

  • HistoryNet

    Crisis Watch: Misplaced Faith

    Our diplomats trust our enemies, not us. A good con knows that the easiest person to fool is the one who wants to be fooled. And in this age of global upheaval, our diplomats want to be fooled. They routinely put their faith in foreign...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    War for Peace in Vietnam

    Final peace talks in Paris, interrupted by ferocious Yuletide bombing, epitomized the byzantine and often bizarre maneuverings that let the United States find a way out of Vietnam. IN TET’S WAKE, FORMAL PEACE TALKS between the United...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Norman, The Third Tour

    General Schwarzkopf’s return to Vietnam more than 20 years after his second combat tour brought him closure—and a mysterious threat of bloodshed. IN 1991 THE FACE OF U.S. MILITARY POWER WAS GENERAL NORMAN SCHWARZKOPF. Burly and...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: The Cambodian Wars

    The Cambodian Wars: Clashing Armies and CIA Covert Operations by Kenneth Conboy, University Press of Kansas, 2013 With the recent passing of Cambodia’s long-time monarch Norodom Sihanouk and the excruciatingly slow international war...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Before the Quagmire

    Before the Quagmire: American Intervention in Laos, 1954-1961, by William J. Rust, University of Kentucky Press, 2012 Laos was the “cork in the bottle” of Southeast Asia, warned President Dwight D. Eisenhower shortly before the tragic...

  • American History Magazine

    The First: Royal Visit

    David Kalakaua, the king of Hawaii, was on a commercial mission when he arrived in Washington, D.C., in December 1874 to meet with President Ulysses Grant. His independent island nation had sugar to sell, and the United States had a sweet...

  • American History Magazine

    Nikita Khrushchev Ogles Marilyn Monroe

    When President Dwight Eisenhower invited Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev to a summit meeting at Camp David in 1959, Khrushchev eagerly accepted, informing Ike that he’d like to spend “ten to fifteen days” traveling around the United...