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Food Culture

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Gettysburg Picnic Truce

    Recipe for (temporary) Federal-Confederate Reconciliation: 500 chickens, 30 hams and countless pies, all served alfresco at Camp Letterman. The Battle of Gettysburg had been over for two months, but more than 1,600 badly wounded Union and...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Hardtack & Coffee

    Hardtack & Coffee: The Unwritten Story of Army Life By John D. Billings Images of Civil War soldiers in camp usually feature men sitting around a roaring fire, laughing as they tell stories, enjoying the fraternity of fighting men. We...

  • American History Magazine

    Pennsylvania’s Utopian Candyman

    Chocolate tycoon Milton Hershey took tomorrow and turned it into a dream for the working class. For Milton S. Hershey, the smell of success was sweet indeed. It smelled like chocolate—the first milk chocolate ever produced in...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Man Behind the Incredible, Nearly Inedible K Ration

    During one particularly difficult five-month stretch, the British forces of Gen. Orde Wingate in India had nothing to eat—day after day, breakfast, lunch, and dinner—but U.S. Army K rations. A few months later some visitors arrived to...

  • American History Magazine

    He Did His Damndest to Feed the World

    Norman Borlaug was an American original who saved more lives than anyone else in history. By the mid-1900s, one in six people in the world didn’t have enough to eat. As population growth outstripped available food, Norman Borlaug decided...

  • American History Magazine

    Thomas Jefferson: Founding Foodie

    The new French stove is installed. The dumbwaiters are operational. Housemade cider, beer and French wine fill the cellar at Monticello in anticipation of Thomas Jefferson’s homecoming. After serving two terms as president, Jefferson is...

  • American History Magazine

    Kudzu- Japan’s Wonder Vine

    How a wonder vine unveiled by Japan at the 1876 Centennial began eating America. The amazing wonders on display at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia—the first world’s fair held in the United States—included Alexander...

  • American History Magazine

    The First: American Chicken Breed

    The U.S. is now home to half the world’s chickens, but the bird is not native to the Americas. (Sorry, but the prairie chicken, which is a native American bird, is actually a type of grouse.) Chickens as we know them were brought by...

  • American History Magazine

    The First: Breakfast Cereal

    There were no prizes at the bottom of a Granula tin. Good health was the reward for those who chomped their way through the dense, gritty cereal made from twice-baked whole wheat flour—and nothing else. Dr. James Caleb Jackson introduced...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Starving the South

    Starving the South: How the North Won the Civil War by Andrew F. Smith, St. Martin’s Press Unlike the Midwest, which produced huge quantities of wheat and meat in the 1860s, Southern plantation owners focused mostly on cotton and...

  • American History Magazine

    The First Best-Selling Diet Book

    ‘Eat what you like and grow thin,’ claimed Dr. Lulu Hunt Peters, author of the 1918 diet book that introduced Americans to calorie counting. Peters preached portion control and exercise to a mostly female audience who’d come of age...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    What wine goes with rat?

    Somebody enjoyed the world’s best wines during one of the war’s worst sieges. No siege in American military history lasted longer than the Union attack on Port Hudson, the Confederate stronghold overlooking a sharp bend in the...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Irish & German– Whiskey & Beer

    Irish & German– Whiskey & Beer: Drinking Patterns in the Civil War  Thomas P. Lowry; CreateSpace.com A popular stereotype during the Civil War years was that the Irish were drunk on whiskey and brave in battle, while Germans...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: The Taste of War

    The Taste of War: World War Two and the Battle for Food  By Lizzie Collingham, 656 pp. The Penguin Press, 2012. $35.  ‘We’re supposed to die of starvation, to make place for the Germans.” This was how the people of Kiev...

  • HistoryNet

    Gourmet Grunts, 1968-70

    GIs used ingenuity – and initiative – to turn field rations into field “cuisine” during the Vietnam War. In every war, soldiers have griped about their food; American GIs serving during the Vietnam War were no exception. Yet even...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Bread-and-Butter issues in the Civil War

    North Carolina Governor Zebulon Vance not have realized it immediately, but the letter he might received from Margaret Smith in February 1863 was a report from another front in the war. Speaking not just for herself but for the rest of the...