Flight Technology Archives | Page 3 of 34 | HistoryNet MENU

Flight Technology

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Lighter than Air

    Lighter than Air: An Illustrated History of Balloons and Airships  by Tom D. Crouch, The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2009, $35.  Anyone who thinks that the days of lighter-than-air flight are over should pick...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: North American’s T-6

    North American’s T-6: A Definitive History of the World’s Most Famous Trainer  by Dan Hagedorn, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2009, $32.95. Using the word “definitive” in a title is risky, but this beautiful volume...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Designer-Pilot Kurt Tank

    Though best known as a designer of airplanes, particularly the lethal Focke-Wulf Fw-190, Tank never lost sight of his pilot roots. Along with the Griffon-engine Spitfire Mk. XVI, the Hawker Tempest V and the Dornier Do-335—not to mention...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Caproni Flying Barrel

    Luigi Stipa claimed his ‘intubed propeller’ was the ancestor of the jet engine. Even in an era when aircraft designers experimented with every conceivable shape and size, the prototype designed by Italian engineer Luigi Stipa and built...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Build Your Own “Arizona” Kingfisher

    Until recently, about the only place to find a Vought OS2U King­fisher model was at model club swap meets. Then Revell USA reissued its Mono­gram Models 1/48th-scale kit of the floatplane (#6907), which is simple and inexpensive, with...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Gunships

    Gunships: The Story of Spooky, Shadow, Stinger and Spectre by Wayne Mutza, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2009, $34.95. Wayne Mutza writes for the expert as well as the casual reader. His latest effort, Gunships, is loaded with...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Engine With a Saddle

    What the bantamweight Bearcat lacked in finesse it made up for with brute strength. The Grumman F8F Bearcat is the Dodge Viper of airplanes. Both are outrageous, lightweight, in-your-face- American, monster-motor artifacts of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Twin-Boom Boondoggle

    The Hughes D-2 went up in flames before the Army Air Forces even had an opportunity to test it. Howard Hughes’ obsession with record-breaking is well documented. Everything we know about the eccentric multimillionaire suggests that,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Scratch-Built Peashooter

    After a decade of dedicated effort, the San Diego Air & Space Museum’s P-26A reproduction is nearing completion. Amid the din of pounding rivet guns, skilled workmen are busy building a cutting-edge fighter—cutting-edge for 1933,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    British Airships 1905-30

    British Airships 1905-30 by Ian Castle, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, England, 2009, $17.95. By 1914 British airship technology was lagging far behind Germany’s, with no rigid airship program and few airships of any other description. But...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Northrop’s Night Hunter

    Northrop’s Night Hunter: P-61 Black Widow by Jeff Kolln, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2009, $39.95. Unquestionably the finest Allied night fighter of World War II, the Northrop P-61 Black Widow entered service in 1944 and served...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: DC-3- A Legend in Her Time

    DC-3: A Legend in Her Time, A 75th Anniversary Photographic Tribute  by Bruce McAllister, Roundup Press, Boulder, Colo., 2010, $49.95.  It has been said that the Douglas DC-3 transport helped lift America out of the Depression...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Homebuilt Visionary

    Long before the kitplane craze, Bernard Pietenpol designed airplanes that average consumers could build and fly themselves. About 80 years ago a group of aviation enthusiasts concluded that the “big guys” had cornered the market on...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Sabre’s Cutting Edge

    Napier’s temperamental 24-cylinder gem was one of the most innovative engines of its time. Enigmatic, charismatic and, yes, a pain in the rear are just some of the descriptions that could be applied to the Napier Sabre, surely the most...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Battle With the Air

    After establishing a new flight record over Lake Erie in 1910, Glenn Curtiss nearly came to grief on his return trip to Cleveland. Thousands of Clevelanders watched as Glenn Hammond Curtiss paced the Euclid Beach Park pier on the morning...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Built for Speed: The Napier-Heston T.5

    Britain hoped to take the airspeed record back from Germany with the Napier-Heston T.5, but it literally fell flat on its first flight. In 1935 the British engine manufacturer D. Napier and Son came out with an extremely advanced, hugely...