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Flight Technology

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Into the Air

    Louis XVI appointed two of his courtiers to become France’s first air travelers. Just before 2 P.M. on Friday, November 21, 1738 near the Bois de Boulogne, two men stood inside a circular wicker basket draped with blue cloth. One of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Concorde

    Concorde by Frederic Beniada and Michel Fraile, Zenith Press, St. Paul, Minn., 2006, $60. The name Concorde immediately conjures up mental images of the sleek, arrowlike Air France–British Airways supersonic transport that represented...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Pou du Ciel

    History’s first homebuilt entrepreneur named his aircraft after an insect. By the mid-1920s aviation was no longer solely the province of the professional. The man (and woman) on the street desperately wanted to get in on it....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    BQM-34A Firebee

    The Combat Air Museum’s restoration stands out after decades of obscurity. Dick Trupp passing by the plane many times as he and his wife traveled north from Topeka, Kansas, to visit relatives in Nebraska. Trupp, the wing commander of the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The China Clipper, Pan American Airways and Popular Culture

    The China Clipper, Pan American Airways and Popular Culture by Larry Weirather, McFarland, Jefferson, N.C., 2007, $35. Aviation historians remember Pan American World Airways as “the chosen instrument” of the U.S. government because it...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hall’s Aluminum Wonders

    Achieving maximum strength at minimum weight. During the Golden Age of flight, many new aviation firms sprang up. By far the greater percentage failed within their first few years. The reasons vary. In some instances, the whole company was...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Here Today, Gone Tomorrow

    The Airplane Division of Curtiss-Wright Corporation When World War II ended in August 1945, Curtiss-Wright Corporation could still claim the distinction of being the largest aircraft manufacturing company in the United States, having...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Building a Supersonic Interceptor

    America’s first supersonic interceptor evolved from the most revolutionary development specs in U.S. Air Force history. Rather than procuring an airframe and its weapons as separate items, the 1950 proposal that spawned Convair’s F-102...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Reflections on the U.S. Air Force

    Three inspired leaders molded America’s Air Force in their own image—and changed it forever. In the first 60 years of its existence, the U.S. Air Force went from the hollow shell of its World War II demobilization status to become the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aircraft With Character

    An engineer-artist offers a unique perspective with his personality-infused illustrations. You’d be hard-pressed to find an aviation enthusiast who hasn’t seen some of Hank Caruso’s “Aerocatures.” They’ve appeared on calendars...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Skyblazers

    October 1949, Gütersloh, West Germany—The U.S. Air Forces Europe (USAFE) flight demonstration team, the Skyblazers, held its first public demonstration at a Royal Air Force base in occupied Germany. The team’s close-in aerobatics...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- September 2007

    One of Our Airliners Is Missing If somebody said a four- engine airliner had disappeared with everybody aboard, you’d be surprised. If they added that it had disappeared in the populous U.S. Midwest and was seen by numerous eyewitnesses...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Mystery Ship: November 2018

    Can you identify this turboprop target tug? Click here for the answer!  ...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Mystery Ship: November 2018

    Ferner Werke C-3605 “Alpine Anteater” Originally conceived in 1934 by the Swiss Federal Construction Workshop as a general-purpose warplane combining the roles of fighter, reconnaissance and tactical support, the C-36 two-seat...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    MACH 3 Man: Robert J. Gilliland

    Lockheed’s chief test pilot for the SR-71 Blackbird overcame numerous inflight emergencies during his career and never failed to bring an airplane back to earth. In the early afternoon of December 22, 1964, Lockheed’s legendary...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Jumbo: Boeing 747

    Boeing’s 747 didn’t just revolutionize airline travel, it changed the world as we know it. If you were a hotshot airplane designer at Boeing in 1965, there was only one place you wanted to be. The aerodynamicists, the airframe...