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Exploration

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Come North with Me

    Come North with Me by Bernt Balchen Arctic explorer and pilot Bernt Balchen has long been one of my heroes. I had been reading about his daring exploits for many years before I was fortunate enough to meet him. Working with him on a...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Bear Butte, Sacred to Cheyennes and Lakotas, Looms Near the Black Hills

    Humans have gathered at the formation for four millennia. Crossing the South Dakota plains from the east, the traveler first sees the purplish Black Hills stretching across the western horizon. A singular massive peak stands apart, looming...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Jedediah Smith

    Jedediah Smith: No Ordinary Mountain Man  by Barton H. Barbour, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2009, $26.95.  Comanche Indians cut short Jedediah Smith’s life in 1831, but the trapper and explorer had accomplished much...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Here Be Dragons

    John Wesley Powell’s Colorado River Exploring Expedition completed its rapids-defying Grand Canyon passage 140 years ago, but the disappearance of three members remains a mystery. The explorers were in rough shape on August 27, 1869,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Westering Walker

    Fur trader and explorer Joe Walker kept up his family’s wandering tradition and contributed mightily to U.S. expansion to the ‘far coast’. At the fur trade rendezvous of 1833 at Horse Creek, on the Green River in what is now Wyoming,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Frontiersman Andy Hall Served Major Powell and Wells Fargo

    After exploring the Grand Canyon, he worked in Arizona. “I have not time to write to you now,” young Andy Hall scribbled to his mother from Green River, Wyoming Territory, in May 1869. “I am going down the Colorado River in boats...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: America’s Hidden History

    America’s Hidden History: Untold Tales of the First Pilgrims, Fighting Women and Forgotten Founders Who Shaped a Nation Kenneth C. Davis, Collins, 288 pp., $26.95 Kenneth C. Davis has become a successful “brand name” author, in part...

  • American History Magazine

    Paradise Found: Manhattan

    Landscape ecologists re-create the natural world explorer Henry Hudson encountered when he visited the island of Manhattan 400 years ago. In his new book, Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City, Eric Sanderson quotes an...

  • American History Magazine

    What Is Out There?

    With the nation a mere 43 years old, a party of “scientifick” explorers hurtled into the mysterious West and discovered a cornucopia of new life. In May 1819, a bizarre apparition headed west from Pittsburgh down the Ohio River, bound...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviators: Angel Flight

    Jimmie Angel searched Venezuela’s “Lost World” for a fabled river of gold, but all he found was a waterfall—the world’s tallest, as it turned out. Pilot and adventurer James Crawford Angel lived a life of contradictions in which...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Impossible Heights: The Alaskan Miners Who Conquered Mount McKinley

    The Sourdough Expedition was a sweet success—sort of. Following his departure from Fairbanks, Alaska, in December 1909, miner Thomas Lloyd had sent only one communication out of the frigid Alaskan interior. The short message, delivered...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Thousand Miles by Airship

    In 1910 an eccentric newspaperman, his crew and a cat set out from Atlantic City in a dirigible, aiming to make the first transatlantic crossing by air. W alter Wellman is hardly a household name today, but he made a significant...

  • American History Magazine

    Surrounded by Alligators

    While other Americans were gearing up for revolution in 1774, William Bartram waxed poetic about the natural wonders he encountered exploring the St. John’s River in East Florida. “The groves resound the unceasing cries of the...

  • American History Magazine

    Run, River, Run

    John Wesley Powell lost his right arm at Shiloh in the Civil War, but that didn’t affect his ambition. Self-schooled in geology and native cultures, he launched an expedition in 1869 to explore the canyon lands of Colorado. He set off...

  • American History Magazine

    Through an Iceberg Darkly

    Beauty and danger in Alaska. No American is more revered by conservationists than John Muir, and few have lived such a colorful life. Born in Scotland in 1838, Muir arrived in Portage, Wisc., with his family at age 11, and later attended...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: North to the Orient

    North to the Orient  by Anne Morrow Lindbergh  In July 1931, Charles and Anne Lindbergh set off on the adventure of a lifetime, an unofficial survey flight on the great-circle route from New York to points in the Far East. Unlike...