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Espionage

  • Military History, MH Letters

    November 2017 Readers’ Letters

    Readers sound off about the Japanese surrender aboard USS Missouri, the Siege of Boston, Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini and U.S. airman and spy Martin Monti...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Stealing Secrets

    Stealing Secrets: How a Few Daring Women Deceived Generals, Impacted Battles, and Altered the Course of the Civil War H. Donald Winkler, Cumberland House The Civil War is full of tales of deception practiced by enterprising femmes fatales...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Shadow Knights

    Shadow Knights: The Secret War Against Hitler By Gary Kamiya, 160 pp. illustrations by Jeffrey Smith. Simon & Schuster,2010.$19.99. Britain’s top-secret spy network, the Special Operations Executive (SOE), comes to vivid life in this...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Adventures of Mutt and Jeff

    Named by MI5 for comic strip characters, two Nazi spies working for Britain proved that espionage is serious business Late in the evening of April 6, 1941, a twin-engine seaplane took off from the city of Stavanger on Norway’s southwest...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- June 2011

    The War’s Deadliest Weapon: Starvation World War II was about many things: ideology, conquest, survival. But food historian Lizzie Collingham makes a persuasive case in a new book that the war was largely about food. In The Taste of War:...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    A Psywar Set Piece

    Rarely in a well-played propaganda campaign will a fundamental fact that discredits the intended message and exposes a brazen lie be left on the table. So when the martyred Viet Cong Nguyen Van Be was found to be undisputedly alive in...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    When Psywar Went So Wrong

    A long-running psychological warfare battle over an alleged Viet Cong martyr grew to resemble MAD magazine’s “Spy vs. Spy” The cultivation of heroes can be critical in a society at war. In early 1967 Barry Zorthian, the head of the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: Just how much can a girl get away with?

    When the Civil War began, no one—neither politicians nor military men—expected to have to contend with women. War, like the politics that made it, was men’s work; women were innocents to be protected. This idea was as old as...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Her War: Fighting Sarah Thompson

    Union troops in Confederate territory opposition from secessionist women. Confederates, expected however, hadn’t anticipated having to do battle with Union-sympathizing Southern women. Unionism among Southerners was an unexpected and...

  • American History Magazine

    Interview: Tim Weiner, spy trade expert

    Tim Weiner has won the Pulitzer Prize for his national security reporting and the National Book Award for his best-selling Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA. His new book, Enemies: A History of the FBI, examines the Bureau from a...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    “That woman was worth a whole brigade”

    A Quaker woman’s quiet courage helped Phil Sheridan win the Third Battle of Winchester. Rebecca Wright knew Union Major General Philip H. Sheridan needed her help, but she also believed that helping him could endanger her own family,...

  • World War II Magazine

    Mystery of London Cage

    Did interrogators at a secret British facility go too far in extracting information from German POWs? In the summer of 1940, just after the Dunkirk evacuation and as Britain girded for a possible German invasion, the British War Office...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII DVD Review: Nazi Collaborators

    Nazi Collaborators: The True Stories of the Nazi Conspirators  Directed by Jean-François Delassus. 4 discs, $20.  Maintaining the Nazi death grip on the Reich’s far-flung occupied lands partly depended on a patch-quilt network...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII TV Review: Secret War

    Secret War: The Secret Agents Who Set Europe Ablaze 13 episodes on 4 DVDs, $79.99. Without their edge in espionage, the Allies would have struggled—at best—to win the war. One of Churchill’s first acts as prime minister was to form...

  • Military History Book Reviews

    Book Review: Silver

    Mihir Bose reveals the World War II espionage activities of Bhagat Ram Talway, code name "Silver"...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: John Brown’s Spy

    John Brown’s Spy: The Adventurous Life and Tragic Confession of John E. Cook  Steven Lubet, Yale University Press John E. Cook is the damnedest guy you’ve never heard of. Thank goodness Steven Lubet has. In fact, without Cook you...