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Espionage

  • Military History Magazine

    Interview: Thomas Allen- Military Secrets Revealed at Last

    With publication of his book Declassified: 50 Top-Secret Documents that Changed History, historian and author Thomas B. Allen opens the curtain on what amounts to an alternate view of some of the most famous and decisive military conflicts...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: The Limping Lady Spy

    Virginia Hall Office of Strategic Services Distinguished Service Cross France March–September 1944 By any measure, Virginia Hall is one of America’s two greatest female war heroes. Mary Edwards Walker, who earned the Medal of Honor...

  • Military History

    The Secret Life of Erich Gimpel

    Landed by U-boat on the coast of Maine in 1944, the senior agent of a two-man Nazi spy team had a thrilling tale to tell—most of it true...

  • World War II Magazine

    On the Trail of Washington’s Wartime Secrets

    Within weeks of the Pearl Harbor attack, the U.S. Army and U.S. Navy had seized so much property in and around Washington that people joked the war would already be over if America’s armed forces were as good at capturing enemy...

  • World War II Magazine

    His Majesty’s Director of Pornography

    No one ever had to reproach Sefton Delmer with the admonition “know your enemy.” The son of an Australian professor who taught at Berlin University before World War I, Delmer was fluent in German before he ever spoke English. In the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- March 2008

    American Who Infiltrated the Manhattan Project for the Soviets Honored in Russia  It could have been a heart- warming American success story. Born and raised in Iowa, George Koval graduated from Sioux City’s Central High School in...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Code Breaker Who Exposed a Secret German Language

    There was no normal way to become a code breaker in World War II; everyone who landed in the job arrived there more or less by accident. Some recruits to Britain’s code-breaking establishment remembered being asked a few haphazard...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Spy Who Loved Us

    The Spy Who Loved Us: The Vietnam War and Pham Xuan An’s Dangerous Game by Thomas Bass. Public Affairs Books, 2009, $26.95. One of the first lessons in understanding the enigma of Vietnam was taught to me by a veteran Vietnamese...

  • Military History Magazine

    George Washington: Spymaster in Chief

    General George Washington’s voluminous correspondence now reveals his no-holds-barred covert operations against the British. Abraham Woodhull hated his job. A humble farmer from Setauket, Long Island, he had made his peace with the...

  • American History Magazine

    Can the CIA Be Reformed?

    Legacy of Ashes: The History of the CIA by Tim Weiner The 9/11 attack was “a systemic failure of the American government,” writes Pulitzer Prize– winning New York Times reporter Tim Weiner in his distressing chronicle of the first 60...

  • World War II Magazine

    Birds of War

    A thousands-strong force of messengers, spies, and counterspies helped save lives and win battles throughout the war. It’s hardly the image of wartime intrigue: a group of British pigeon fanciers discussing—what else—pigeons one...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Art of the Double Cross

    With an audacious scheme that paired Enigma decrypts with a network of turned enemy spies, Britain pitted Germany against itself throughout the war. In early 1941, an astonishing idea began to dawn on John Masterman, a British official...

  • World War II Magazine

    Unveiling Venlo

    The Nazis’ violent abduction of two British spies in Holland in 1939 was a major embarrassment for Britain. But far more was at stake than red faces in Whitehall. In 1935, a former British secret agent of World War I vintage, Capt....

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Review: An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge

    An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (1962) Directed by Robert Enrico “A man stood upon a railroad bridge in northern Alabama, looking down into the swift water twenty feet below. The man’s hands were behind his back, the wrists bound...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: An Artist in Treason

    An Artist in Treason: The Extraordinary Double Life of General James Wilkinson by Andro Linklater, Walker & Co., New York, 2009, $27 James Wilkinson claimed that his father’s last words to him were a threat to disinherit him if he...

  • Military History Magazine

    Untouchable Agent 13

    James Wilkinson served as commanding general of the U.S. Army under the first four presidents—all the while engaging in a treasonous intrigue with Spain During its fight for independence from Great Britain, and through its early days as...