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Colonialism

  • American History Magazine

    Jamestown at 400: Digging for Truth

    Forget what you’ve learned about Pilgrims and Plymouth Rock. Stunning new archaeological evidence reveals that the real roots of American independence and the entrepreneurial spirit which drove it were thriving in Virginia’s Tidewater....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Foundation for an Empire

    On a hot and humid day near a nondescript village in June 1757, Robert Clive won an improbable victory that set Britain on a course to dominate India for 190 years. Few British commanders had ever faced such long odds. When Colonel Robert...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: The First Vietnam War

    The First Vietnam War: Colonial Conflict and Cold War Crisis Edited by Mark Atwood Lawrence and Fredrik Logevall. Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 2007, hardcover $45, softcover $22.95. At the end of World War II, most European powers...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Replacing France

    Replacing France: The Origins of the American Intervention in Vietnam by Kathryn C. Statler. The University Press of Kentucky, Lexington, 2007, hardcover $45. If you’re curious about how we got into the mess that was Vietnam, Kathryn C....

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: A New World

    A New World: England’s First View of America Yale Center for British Art, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. March 6-June 1 The British artist and explorer John White first sailed to North America in May 1577 as part of a Cathay Company...

  • Vietnam Magazine

    Vietnam Book Review: Colonial Good Life

    The Colonial Good Life: A Commentary on Andre Joyeux’s Vision of French Indochina translated, introduced and annotated by Michael G. Vann and Joel Montague. White Lotus Press, 2008. French artist Andre Joyeux served as an art teacher in...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: America’s Hidden History

    America’s Hidden History: Untold Tales of the First Pilgrims, Fighting Women and Forgotten Founders Who Shaped a Nation Kenneth C. Davis, Collins, 288 pp., $26.95 Kenneth C. Davis has become a successful “brand name” author, in part...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: A Mercy

    A Mercy Toni Morrison, Alfred A. Knopf, 167 pp., $23.95 To the collective American mind, pre-Revolutionary America is a sparsely populated expanse of raw, green land, shrouded in thick mist, primitive belief and barely concealed savagery....

  • American History Magazine

    Why Was Life So Hard for the Pilgrims?

    America was an unrivaled paradise with rivers full of fish and forests full of game. Even the much-feared natives weren’t so savage. Yet within a year, more than half the colonists at Plymouth, Jamestown, and perhaps Roanoke, were dead....

  • Wild West Magazine

    Catlin Was Not the First but Perhaps the Last To Believe the...

    The ‘theory’ had bolstered the British position in North America. Painter and author George Catlin loved Indians, and he loved the Mandans, but he wasn’t quite sure the Mandans were Indians. In his Letters and Notes on the Manners,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: Coloma, California

    In 1845 James Marshall took a carpentry job with John Sutter, later constructing a sawmill to supply lumber for Sutter’s ambitious project—a colony he called New Helvetia (present-day Sacramento, Calif., and environs) after his native...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Smallpox in the Blankets

    Genocide or hokum? In any case, the dreaded disease killed Indians in vast numbers. Plains Indians kept track of the passing years by winter counts, pictures painted in spirals, often on the smooth inner hide of buffalo robes. Each tribe...

  • American History Magazine

    Interview with John M. Barry, scholar and writer

    John M. Barry dropped out of graduate school in history to become a football coach, eventually rising to assistant coach at Tulane University. He quit coaching to write, first as a freelance journalist in Washington, D. C., where he...

  • American History Magazine

    First Encounter

    The Pilgrims were hungry and weak from scurvy after two months at sea by the time the Mayflower anchored in the icy waters on the bay side of Cape Cod in the winter of 1620. Miles Standish led a small group of explorers on desperate...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Brink of War at Fashoda

    Among the most decisive battles in history are the ones that never took place. In the 1890s European nations vied for colonies and influence in what has come to be known as the “Scramble for Africa.” Germany, Italy, Portugal, Belgium...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Perfect Storm at Tenochtitlan 1521

    How Cortés’s band of hidalgos destroyed the Mexica Empire. It had been an amazing triumph, an unprecedented journey to the top of the wheel of fortune. It was May 1520, and Cortés and his little army—about 400 Spanish warriors and...