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Patuxent Crown Jewel

While the Wright brothers were supplying versions of their Flyer to the U.S. Army, on February 25, 1911, Glenn Curtiss test-flew a version of his Model D tailored for the Navy. Using a 75-hp Cur­tiss O...
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Kermit’s Curtiss-Wrights

The Curtiss-Wright CW-19 is a rare representative of the transitional days when U.S. aviation stepped fully into the mid-20th century.
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Letter from Aviation History—July 2014

The Show Goes On After a year off due to federal sequester budget cuts, the U.S. military flight demo teams—the U.S. Navy Blue Angels and Air Force Thunderbirds—are back in action, thrilling...
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Relentless In Battle

Hellcat pilot David McCampbell used his gunnery skills to achieve “ace in a day” status twice, earning the Medal of Honor and ultimately becoming the U.S. Navy’s ace of aces
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RAF’s Best Photos

Visit the RAF Museum London's Colindale site to see the 24th annual RAF Photographic Competition, on display until April 28.
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Osprey Settles Into New Nest

The Air Force’s oldest Osprey (a CV-22), originally built as a preproduction aircraft for the U.S. Navy, enters retirement.
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‘Wichita Fokker’ Takes Flight

The first production Travel Air, the Model 2000, was an American classic. It was the first successful replacement for the weary, worn-out, war-surplus Curtiss JN-4 Jennys that in the mid-1920s comprised the...
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Letter from Aviation History—May 2014

The Miracle of Saint-Nazaire Like many young men of his generation, Alan Magee enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. At 5 foot 6 inches, he was judged the...
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Miracle Landing Off Korea

Setting down on a carrier is difficult under the best conditions—but next to impossible if you can’t see.
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Doolittle Raiders Drink a Final Toast

A milestone historical event took place on November 9, 2013, at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force. Rather than wait until there were only two Doolittle Tokyo Raiders left to turn over their own...