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  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aerobat ‘Speed’ Holman

    The daredevil Midwestern flier lived fast and died fast. Charles W. “Speed” Holman put his native Minnesota on the map with a series of aerial feats, breaking numerous speed and stunt flying records. But unlike Charles Lindbergh,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Grumman Gulfstream I: The Bizjet Turns 50

    The first-ever business plane was a Curtiss JN-4 owned by the Heddon Co., a Michigan fishing lure manufacturer that in 1919 painted the Jenny to look like a big fish and flew it around to Midwestern tackle shops and fishing events. Despite...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- January 2009

    Last of the Buffalos On June 25, 1942, Finnish Lieutenant Lauri Pekuri shot down two Soviet Hawker Hurricanes before another set his Brewster B-239, No. BW-372, on fire, forcing him to ditch in Lake Kolejärvi, in eastern Karelia, and swim...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Review: Pacific Storm

    This ambitious sim offers something for everyone. World War II’s Pacific theater encompassed an ocean, parts of several continents and the shorelines of many islands in between. So when a game boasts a scope of the entire Pacific War, it...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: I Could Never Be So Lucky Again

    I Could Never Be So Lucky Again by General James H. “Jimmy” Doolittle, with Carroll V. Glines This is one of those extremely rare literary pairings where the top man in a field collaborates on his autobiography with a top writer who...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Radical Wings & Wind Tunnels

    Radical Wings & Wind Tunnels: Advanced Concepts Tested at NASA Langley by Joseph R. Chambers and Mark A. Chambers, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2008, $34.95. This book covers a 91-year period of remarkable achievements by...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: The Nieuport 28

    The Nieuport 28: America’s First Fighter by Theodore Hamady, Schiffer Publishing Ltd., Atglen, Pa., 2008, $59.95. The United States never developed an indigenous fighter during World War I, so it got by using British Sopwith Camels and...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Hell Hawks!

    Hell Hawks! The Untold Story of the American Fliers Who Savaged Hitler’s Wehrmacht by Robert F. Dorr and Thomas D. Jones, Zenith Press, Osceola, Wis., 2008, $24.95. Hell Hawks! tells the story of the 365th Fighter Group, which fought a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Aircraft Projects

    U.S. Experimental & Prototype Aircraft Projects: Fighters 1939-1945 by Bill Norton, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2008, $44.95. It’s no secret that World War II motivated nations to design, test and produce fighter aircraft...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Quest for Zerzura

    Laszlo Almasy pioneered the aerial exploration of the North African desert, locating Egypt’s legendary ‘lost oasis.’ Unlike the title character of the Oscar-winning 1996 film The English Patient, the real-life Laszlo Almasy didn’t...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Flying the Fury- FJ-4

    North American’s FJ-4 was low-slung, sex and built for speed. The FJ-4 Fury slipped through the sound barrier with ease—my grandmother would have said “like grease through a goose.” Essentially a souped-up F-86 Sabrejet, it was...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Rescue at Entebbe

    An Israeli transport squadron commander recounts the daring air operation to liberate hijacking hostages in Uganda. Like all Israelis, Lieutenant Colonel Joshua Shani had been closely following the hijacking drama of Air France Flight 139....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Flying Boudoir

    The Sage Type 2 fighter’s elegant enclosed cockpit set it apart from other early two-seaters. When World War I began, few aircraft existed that had been specifically designed for military use. Of those, most were intended for...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Wild Sow Penned

    A newly reconstructed Me-109G-14 takes its place alongside other historic aircraft at the National World War II Museum. An engine cowling is not the most substantial part on which to base a restoration. But for Wolfgang Falch of Sandy Air...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Fine Art Takes Wing

    It’s time aviation artists were given the respect they so richly deserve. On a recent trip to the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, I discovered among the dazzling collection of impressionist art a marvelous 1910 oil painting of a Levavasseur...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hung Up Over France

    Sixty years later, a quiet hero’s buddies finally hear his war story. “Charlie,” yelled the bombardier of the B-17G bomb-bay doors are jammed open! See what’s wrong.” They had just Bugs Bunny Jr., “the finished dropping a load...