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Aviation History

  • Aviation History Magazine

    World’s First Ace

    Adolphe Pégoud enjoyed international fame even before World War I. The fighter ace—that dead-eyed hotshot who has downed five or more adversaries in aerial combat—is an iconic figure of the air age. The term derives from the French...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The ‘Old Bus’ Endures

    Sir Charles Kingsford-Smith’s famous Fokker Southern Cross has pride of place in Brisbane. At Brisbane Airport, not far from where today’s jumbo jets touch down after their transpacific flights, the Fokker F.VIIb/3m trimotor Southern...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Briefing- January 2010

    Aussie Sabre Returns to the Air You might not recognize the fighter designator “CA-27,” but think F-86: The CA-27 was the hotrod Australian version of the North American Sabre, built by Commonwealth Aircraft, the Melbourne company that...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Movie Stars With Wings

    Before computer-generated images, aviation films had real airplanes and real aviators at the controls....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    WWII Around the Globe

    Take control in the East and West, on the surface and in the air. There’s considerable ground to cover when re-creating World War II aviation, but a pair of strategy games manage to do a fairly good job of it. Battlestations Pacific...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Big Show

    The Big Show by Pierre Clostermann Published in 1951 and revised in 2006, Pierre Clostermann’s memoir of aerial combat was one of the first to emerge from WWII. Reflecting the perceptions of an extremely opinionated French volunteer in...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Black Fokker Leader

    Black Fokker Leader: Carl Degelow— The First World War’s Last Airfighter Knight  by Peter Kilduff, Grub Street Publishing, London, 2009, $39.95.  In 1979 World War I aviation historian Peter Kilduff published a book based on...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Lighter than Air

    Lighter than Air: An Illustrated History of Balloons and Airships  by Tom D. Crouch, The Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Md., 2009, $35.  Anyone who thinks that the days of lighter-than-air flight are over should pick...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Harold F. Pitcairn

    Harold F. Pitcairn: Aviator, Inventor, and Developer of the Autogiro by Carl R. Gunther, Bryn Athyn College Press, Pa., 2009, $29.95. Harold Pitcairn’s brief entry in the Aviation Hall of Fame, written a quarter century after his death,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: X-Plane Crashes

    X-Plane Crashes: Exploring Experimental, Rocket Plane and Spycraft Incidents, Accidents and Crash Sites by Peter W. Merlin and Tony Moore, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2009, $29.95. Frankly speaking, this book could have been a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: North American’s T-6

    North American’s T-6: A Definitive History of the World’s Most Famous Trainer  by Dan Hagedorn, Specialty Press, North Branch, Minn., 2009, $32.95. Using the word “definitive” in a title is risky, but this beautiful volume...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Reviews: Luftwaffe

    In the Skies of France: A Chronicle of JG 2 “Richthofen,” Volume I, 1934-1940 by Erik Mombeeck and Jean-Louis Roba, with Chris Goss, ASBL, Linkebeek, Belgium, 2009, $74. Storming the Bombers: A Chronicle of JG 4, The Luftwaffe’s 4th...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Making of a War Hero

    Before he gained fame in America as an airplane designer and air power advocate, Alexander de Seversky made a name for himself as Russia’s leading World War I naval ace. Alexander P. de Seversky is best remembered today for building the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Rescue at 32,000 Feet

    How do you get the pilot of a single-seat fighter down from altitude if he’s unconscious? For the men of the U.S. Air Force’s 154th Fighter Bomber Squadron, November 16, 1951, started out just like any other day at a forward com- bat...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Return to Gordisa

    In his twilight years, a WWII tail-gunner relives the perils of his youth and takes home a powerful memento. Secured in his tail-gunner position at the rear of a Consolidated B-24 Liberator, 20-year-old Sergeant Francis J. Lashinsky was...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Designer-Pilot Kurt Tank

    Though best known as a designer of airplanes, particularly the lethal Focke-Wulf Fw-190, Tank never lost sight of his pilot roots. Along with the Griffon-engine Spitfire Mk. XVI, the Hawker Tempest V and the Dornier Do-335—not to mention...