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Art

  • Wild West Magazine

    The West Goes Pop

    Andy Warhol created a West portfolio a year before his death. Andy Warhol may be better known for his cans of Campbell’s Soup and his Marilyn Monroes, but his penchant for making Pop Art out of America’s national myths also drew him to...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: A New World

    A New World: England’s First View of America Yale Center for British Art, Yale University, New Haven, Conn. March 6-June 1 The British artist and explorer John White first sailed to North America in May 1577 as part of a Cathay Company...

  • American History Magazine

    The First Real Pilgrims

    The oldest known work by a European artist in North America is a watercolor of a near-naked giant, his arm slung around a tiny fop in tights. The giant is chiseled, like a bodybuilder, and covered in tattoos. He wears bracelets and anklets...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Review: John Adams Elder

    John Adams Elder: Fredericksburg’s Artist of the Civil War Retrospective art exhibit Fredericksburg Area Museum and Cultural Center, Fredericksburg, Va., now through September 7, 2008 The Confederacy may have lost the Civil War, but the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- March 2008

    American Who Infiltrated the Manhattan Project for the Soviets Honored in Russia  It could have been a heart- warming American success story. Born and raised in Iowa, George Koval graduated from Sioux City’s Central High School in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artists on War: War in Miniature

    The military heir to Genghis Khan ensured his legacy through the creation of detailed histories illustrated with small but splendid paintings. After Genghis Khan’s empire disintegrated in the 14th century, another brilliant and ruthless...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artists at War: Women in War

    Western art of the last 500 years illustrates the diverse roles women have played in times of conflict. The modern idea of women in war conjures images of combat, with women serving and sometimes dying in an arena long considered the sole...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Fine Art Takes Wing

    It’s time aviation artists were given the respect they so richly deserve. On a recent trip to the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, I discovered among the dazzling collection of impressionist art a marvelous 1910 oil painting of a Levavasseur...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Corsair! The Award-Winning Painting

    American Society of Aviation Artists 2008 Award of Distinction winner. The clean, distinctive lines of Jack Fellows’ award- winning painting are indicative of his careful research and close attention to detail and accuracy. That...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Sid Richardson Museum

    Remington, Russell and other Western masters draw visitors to this museum on Fort Worth's Sundance Square...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Reviews: Florida Art

    The Journey of the Highwaymen  by Catherine M. Enns, Abrams Al Black’s Concrete Dreams  by Gary Monroe, University Press of Florida The Highwaymen: Florida’s Outsider Artists PBS DVD Striving young African Americans in 1950s...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Heroes in Coats, Breeches, and Cock’d Hats

    In The Death of General Wolfe, Benjamin West combined elements of national pride, historical accuracy, and Christian iconography to create a new image of the heroic. On September 13, 1759, British Maj. Gen. James Wolfe and his men drifted...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Delta Dreamer

    Artist-engineer Alexander Lippisch conceived more than 50 radical aircraft designs, including the Nazis’ rocket-powered Me-163. Few aircraft configurations are more familiar than the delta wing, which dominated the sky for many years,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ron Lesser

    New Yorker Ron Lesser covers the Western genre, from film posters for Clint Eastwood to evocative oil paintings...

  • American History Magazine

    Looking in on The Americans

    Photographer Robert Frank hit the road a half century ago and created a record of daily life that came to define an era. In 1955 a Swiss-born photographer named Robert Frank set out on a cross-country tour of the U.S. to capture “the...

  • American History Magazine

    Every Picture Tells a Story

    America’s transformation from a fledgling confederation of 13 colonies to a mature republic took a century and a half. The nation was born, settled and then wracked by civil war; it rebuilt, urbanized and emerged in the 20th century as...