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Archaeology

  • Wild West Magazine

    Archaeologist Scott Digs Western History

    Battle grounds inspire him. Douglas D.Scott,former Great Plains team leader for the National Park Service’s Midwest Archaeological Center, has dug into the battlefields at the Little Bighorn,Sand Creek and the Nez Perce Big Hole,...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Almanac- April 2007

    CSI: Mount Vernon The nation’s oldest house museum has been propelled into the 21st century with a new experiential visitor center and museum. The Ford Orientation Center and Donald W. Reynolds Museum and Education Center opened last...

  • American History Magazine

    Jamestown at 400: Digging for Truth

    Forget what you’ve learned about Pilgrims and Plymouth Rock. Stunning new archaeological evidence reveals that the real roots of American independence and the entrepreneurial spirit which drove it were thriving in Virginia’s Tidewater....

  • American History Magazine

    ‘This Once Great and Lovely City’

    John Lloyd Stephens, Jacksonian Democrat, travel writer and would-be ambassador to Central America, proved that the ancient civilizations of the New World were every bit as impressive as those of Egypt or Greece. In October 1839,...

  • American History Magazine

    Cahokia Mounds Site Was America’s First City

    For almost 25 years I drove past highway signs on I-55 announcing the turnoff for the Cahokia Mounds historic site when – ever I made the trip from Chicago to my childhood home in the Ozarks. I would hesitate, remember the five hours...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Chatter- April 2008

    Lincoln’s Cottage, Predecessor to Camp David, Reopens Camp David, some 60 miles northwest of Washington, D.C., has been a presidential hideaway since 1942. But where did the commander in chief seek respite before that? Abraham...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Chatter- June 2008

    Carter’s Grove Gets New Lease on Life The Carter’s Grove plantation in the Hampton Roads area of Virginia was recently sold by the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation for $15.3 million, and some preservationists are saying that other...

  • American History Magazine

    Washington Grew up Here

    Archaeologists sift through the recently unearthed ruins of George’s childhood home for clues to what made him a man of destiny. On Christmas Eve 1740, fire broke out in a modest clap- board farmhouse across the Rappahannock River from...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- November 2009

    Archaeologists Search for a Lost Marine Patrol on Guadalcanal It was a dark, moonless night on the coast of Guadalcanal, and Lt. Col. Frank Goettge, the intelligence officer for the 1st Marine Division, had a decision to make. Only five...

  • Military History Magazine

    Interview with Odyssey’s Greg Stemm: Salvaging History?

    In February, Florida-based salvage firm Odyssey Marine Exploration www.shipwreck.net announced it had located the wreck of HMS Victory, a 100-gun Royal Navy ship of the line that sank in 1744 during a violent storm in the English Channel....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Custer’s Ghostherders

    Battlefield archaeologists digging at the Little Bighorn have reawakened haunting memories and revived some of the bitter controversies connected with the Last Stand....

  • American History Magazine

    Who Really Discovered America?

    Move over, Columbus. A host of other intrepid explorers lay claim to your mantle. Humans have been a clever, restless lot ever since our earliest known ancestors roamed the grasslands and forests of prehistoric Africa. Pioneering sorts...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    A New Generation Digs Johnson’s Island

    The prison site on Johnson’s Island has proved to be an un – usually rich resource for archaeologists and historians. Thanks to a combination of historical documentation and field research, the prison stockade, Fort Johnson, the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- January 2009

    Vatican Says Wartime Pope Was No Friend of the Nazis It may have been the finest hour for some, but the war years were tough on the Vatican. During and after World War II, Pope Pius XII, who led the Catholic Church from 1939 to 1958, was...

  • American History Magazine

    Relics of an Illusory Past

    Governors Island was until recently one of the best kept secrets of New York City: a quiet sanctuary a mere 800 yards from lower Manhattan that was largely deserted after the Coast Guard closed a post there in 1996. But this past summer,...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Gazette- April 2010

    Archaeologists Hoist Anchor From Wreckage of Blackbeard’s Last Pirate Ship The last ship of the notorious pirate Blackbeard, which ran aground in 1718, has yielded the first of its four anchors. The grapnel, used on the longboat of the...