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Julian’s Gamble in the Desert

Inspired by Alexander the Great, the Roman emperor Julian set out to conquer Persia with a massive army, a bold plan, and a thirst for glory.
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MHQ Summer 2010 Table of Contents

The Summer 2010 issue of MHQ features articles about looted art throughout history, the bombing of Guernica, the Battle of Antietam, U.S Navy in the Korean War, the Emperor Julian, and the O'Brien brothers during the American War of Independence.
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Holy Terror: The Rise of the Order of Assassins

Early in the second millennium, Hasan-I Sabbah developed a program of carefully targeted political murder that brought security to his Muslim sect, the Order of Assassins, for over a century and a half.
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Letter from Military History Quarterly – Autumn 2008

Military History Quarterly's new editor, William H. Horne, writes about World War II's East Front, Apache chief Victorio, black troops at New Market Heights, and the trustworthiness of ancient writers' statistics.
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Last of the Vikings – Stamford Bridge, 1066

Just weeks before his watershed fight with the Normans at Hastings, English King Harold II faced a full-blown Viking invasion led by the legendary Harald Hardrada at Stamford Bridge.
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What We Learned… from the Hydaspes River

At the Hydaspes, Alexander the Great faced a forced river crossing opposed by a strong enemy. The methods he employed to defeat Porus' army and open the road to India are still viable over 2,000 years later.
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The Roman Navy: Masters of the Mediterranean

Marcus Vipsanius Aggripa's innovative tactics gave Octavian's Roman fleet a victory over Marc Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium. Rome was the dominant naval power in the Mediterranean for four centuries.
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Adrianople: Last Great Battle of Antiquity

Although it was fought in the East, Emperor Valens' defeat at the Battle of Adrianople had its most direct effect on the affairs of Rome's western provinces. A Roman historian wrote, “No battle in our history except Cannae involved such a massacre.”