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Ancient-Medieval

  • Military History Magazine

    Decisions: Lionheart’s Crossroads

    On July 4, 1187, disaster struck the Christian world. That day Muslim and Christian armies battled on a plateau by an extinct volcano called the Horns of Hattin, near the Sea of Galilee. The Christian crusaders fought desperately but...

  • Military History Book Reviews

    Book Review: Hannibal’s Oath

    John Prevas present a readable, entertaining biography of Hannibal for the lay person...

  • Military History Book Reviews

    Book Review: The Templars

    Dan Jones peers behind the veil of the secretive Crusades-era Knights Templar...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Greatest Ancient Leader

    When Theodore Ayrault Dodge, the American Civil War historian known for his love of the ancient generals, dubbed Alexander, Hannibal, and Caesar “great captains” in 1889, imperial ambition was some- thing to be admired. Today, after...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Unknown Soldier: Georgia’s Renaissance Man

    A boy king vanquished the Turks and ushered in a golden age. In the late 11th century, the European nation-state of Georgia was on the brink of annihilation. Over the previous century Seljuk Turks had invaded and annexed much of the...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Capture of Guînes

    Medieval sieges were arduous and expensive. Besieging armies had to be fed and paid, and the drawn-out process sapped military strength that could be used for more glorious battles. To circumvent a fortified town or castle’s defenses was...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Persian Fallacy

    In the hit fantasy action film 300 the valiant Greeks defending the pass at Thermopylae in 480 BC are portrayed as the epitome of heroic manliness. Their Persian opponents, on the other hand, are depicted as effeminate slaves led by...

  • HistoryNet

    Greek Hoplites, 700-300 B.C.

    These citizen-soldiers of ancient Greece were nearly unstoppable. Greek hoplites were infantry warriors who carried shields, were primarily armed with spears, and fought in the disciplined ranks of a phalanx formation – a solid mass of...

  • HistoryNet

    Rome’s Parthian War, A.D. 161-166

    Old enemies battled in the ancient Middle East. Roman emperor Antoninus Pius (reigned A.D. 138-161) made sure his heirs stayed in Rome under his watchful eye. Thus both of his adoptive sons, Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus, achieved...

  • HistoryNet

    The First Aryan Blitzkrieg

    Over three millennia before Hitler’s “lightning warfare,” chariot-borne Aryan warriors overran the ancient world. The chariots of Mursilis I, grandson of the Hittite Empire’s founder, were nearing the end of their raid that had...

  • HistoryNet

    Julius Caesar at War

    Charismatic leadership and brilliant tactics gained Caesar an empire and made him ruler of Rome. PHARSALUS, GREECE, 48 B.C. For several days, Julius Caesar had watched the army of his fellow Roman but bitter enemy Pompey (Gnaeus Pompeius...

  • HistoryNet

    The Fall of Elam, 645 B.C.

    Assyrians obliterated the troublesome kingdom in present-day Iran. Twenty-first century Iran exasperates its neighbors and defies the world’s major powers with its outrageous and often belligerent behavior. Yet over 2,600 years ago the...

  • HistoryNet

    Kublai Khan’s Mongol Navy

    Ships helped Mongol armies conquer 13th-century China. Beginning in A.D. 1206, Genghis Khan’s Mongol military forces burst out of the central Asian steppes and over the next century conquered the largest contiguous land empire in...

  • HistoryNet

    The Great Siege of Jerusalem

    Roman legions crush The Zealots’ Revolt. Religious extremists within a traditional society in the Middle East rebel against powerful Western influences the fanatics view as threatening their faith. The society itself is torn between...

  • MHQ Magazine

    A Time to Kill

    Fearing the apocalypse was near, Thomas of Marle and the knights of the First Crusade unleashed holy hell on Jerusalem. The climactic battle of the First Crusade ended with the victors bathing in the blood of the vanquished. On July 15, 1...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Guns Vs Pikes in the Habsburg-Valois Wars

    In 1522, Spanish infantrymen demonstrated the terrible power of firearms. Late in 1494, King Charles VIII of France marched into Italy at the head of a massive army—nearly 25,000 men, plus an artillery train of great siege cannons. This...