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Ancient-Medieval

  • Military History Book Reviews

    Book Review: Gaius Marius

    Marc Hayden presents the best extant account of Gaius Marius and his key role in the late Roman Republic...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Review: Heroes

    “Heroes: Mortals and Myths in Ancient Greece” Through Jan. 3, 2010 Walters Art Museum 600 N. Charles St. Baltimore, Md., (410) 547-9000, www.thewalters.org Heroes—mortal and mythological— garnered godlike reverence in ancient...

  • Military History Magazine

    Price of Victory

    Historically, cash—or credit—conquers all. Savvy military leaders have long known that money is the root of all victories. And when the funds run out, the war is over. There is an old saying in military circles: “Amateurs talk...

  • Military History Magazine

    A Tale of Two Chariots

    In a golden age of wheeled warfare, Hittite and Egyptian horsepower vied for mastery of the Middle East. In 1275 BC the armies of the Hittite and Egyptian empires clashed in one of the greatest chariot engagements in history. In the Battle...

  • Military History Magazine

    1215 and All That

    In the bitter 13th Century struggle between King John and the upstart English barons, the Magna Carta was far from the last word. Vengeance has been called the true sport of kings, and few monarchs have taken it as seriously as England’s...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: The Poison King

    The Poison King: The Life and Legend of Mithradates, Rome’s Deadliest Enemy by Adrienne Mayor, Princeton University Press, 2009, $29.95 This is an enjoyable but strange book. The introduction claims it is “the first full-scale...

  • Military History Magazine

    Trajan’s Column

    A 100-foot column in Rome records the 2nd Century military exploits of Trajan and his legions. Nineteen centuries after its construction, Trajan’s Column remains one of antiquity’s great works of architecture, a magnificent work of art...

  • Military History Magazine

    Rome’s Big Idea

    A grand long-term strategy allowed Roman rulers—both good and bad—to shape the empire’s destiny. Why did the Western Roman Empire collapse? The question has consumed historians, clergy and philosophers since its fall in the 5th...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Tactical Exercises: Fear the Phalanx

    The Macedonian formation terrified opponents— and at times overwhelmed the vaunted Roman legion. ONE DAY in late June 168 Rome and Macedon were encamped be- tween Mount Olympus and the port city BC, the armies of of Pydna in Macedonia....

  • MHQ Magazine

    The End of Athens

    A demagogue, a treacherous ally, and a brutal Roman general destroyed the city-state—and democracy—in the first century BC. Two scenes from Athens in the first century BC: Early summer, 88 BC A cheering crowd surrounds the envoy...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Maccabees of St. Gall

    Ninth-century Benedictine monks created a beautifully illustrated account of the Jewish revolt of 174 BC. In the modern imagination, the medieval knight is a glamorous figure. No other warrior in Western history seems so admirable, so...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Great Greek Turncoat

    During the 431–404 BC Peloponnesian War, the unscrupulous Alcibiades was a victorious general—for all sides. In one of his lesser-known plays, Timon of Athens, William Shakespeare put a speech in the mouth of a supporting character...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: Song of Wrath

    Song of Wrath: The Peloponnesian War Begins  by J.E. Lendon, Basic Books, 2010, $35 For more than a generation Peloponnesian War studies have been an educational staple for diplomats and soldiers alike. Readers of Thucydides’...

  • Military History Magazine

    Arsenal of Venice: World’s First Weapons Factory

    Venice’s maritime power arose from a shipyard that with mass-production techniques, superb organization and skilled workers could launch two new ships a day. In 1202, at the outset of the Fourth Crusade, the city-state of Venice accepted...

  • Military History Magazine

    Buddha: Enlightened Warrior

    In his youth Siddhartha Gautama was a brawny, six-foot warrior prince, trained in the art of war—and perhaps touched by tragedy. It is a curious fact of military history that the founders of three of the world’s four major religions...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Best Medicine

    Death came slowly to soldiers wounded on the battlefields of antiquity. The muscle-powered weapons that hacked at their flesh only rarely inflicted sudden death. Bodies pierced by spears or slashed by swords lingered in agony, sometimes...