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American History

  • American History Magazine

    Thomas Paine’s Revolutionary Reckoning

    George Washington refused to come to the rescue when the pamphleteer who put him on his high horse faced the guillotine. On December 28, 1793, at the height of the Reign of Terror in France, Paris police rousted Thomas Paine in the cold...

  • American History Magazine

    The Wild Wild West

    The culture wars of an expansionist era inspired Charles Deas, but he lost his own battle with madness and obscurity. “From what we can see of it over the shoulders of the hundreds crowding around,” raved the New Mirror in 1844, “it...

  • American History Magazine

    Clarence Darrow: Dragonslayer

    Clarence Darrow turned court clashes into mass entertainment as he wielded his lance against big business and big government. He had magnificent presence. He would walk into the courtroom, the conversation would stop and people would...

  • American History Magazine

    Kudzu- Japan’s Wonder Vine

    How a wonder vine unveiled by Japan at the 1876 Centennial began eating America. The amazing wonders on display at the 1876 Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia—the first world’s fair held in the United States—included Alexander...

  • American History Magazine

    Jack Kennedy and Dr. Feelgood

    Did the mysterious injections the president received from a quack doctor before a crucial summit with Comrade Khrushchev put the world closer to the nuclear brink? The doctor wore a white coat that was frequently splattered with blood. His...

  • American History Magazine

    Interview with Jill Lepore, endlessly curious about the Revolution

    Jill Lepore is a professor of American history at Harvard University. She has written six books, including New York Burning: Liberty and Slavery in an Eighteenth-Century City, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, and The Whites of Their...

  • American History Magazine

    The First: American Chicken Breed

    The U.S. is now home to half the world’s chickens, but the bird is not native to the Americas. (Sorry, but the prairie chicken, which is a native American bird, is actually a type of grouse.) Chickens as we know them were brought by...

  • American History Magazine

    Fighting Words Flew When the Nation Was New

    When President Barak Obama traveled to Tucson, Ariz., in January in the wake of the shooting rampage at a meet-and-greet gathering for Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, he urged Americans to talk “with each other in a way that heals, not...

  • American History Magazine

    Gazette- American History June 2011

    Startling Lincoln Discovery Exposed as Fabrication What a difference a digit makes. Back in 1998, a retired psychiatrist named Thomas Lowry made a splash when he claimed that he had found a pardon in the National Archives issued by Abraham...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Review: The Conspirator

    The Conspirator Directed by Robert Redford. Cast: Robin Wright, James McEvoy, Kevin Kline Did Mary Surratt know of the Lincoln assassination plot hatched under her boarding house’s roof? No one knows for sure. But The Conspirator is not...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: David Crockett

    David Crockett: The Lion of the West by Michael Wallis; W.W. Norton David Crockett never signed his name “Davy.” He wasn’t born on a mountaintop in Tennessee: Despite the well-known Disney TV-show theme song, his birthplace was part...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: Captive of the Labyrinth

    Captive of the Labyrinth: Sarah L. Winchester, Heiress to the Rifle Fortune by Mary Jo Ignoffo; University of Missouri Sarah Winchester built a 160-room crazy quilt of a house in San Jose, Calif., that has steadily drawn crowds since it...

  • American History Magazine

    History Happened Here

    Five heritage sites you should go out of your way to visit. Chances are you can quickly tick off the country’s major historic sights: Independence Hall in Philadelphia and the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, Bunker Hill in Boston...

  • American History Magazine

    ‘I Have Come Into a Dreamland’

    Harriet Beecher Stowe seeks refuge in Paris from the notoriety of Uncle Tom’s Cabin. In 1852, a new novel titled Uncle Tom’s Cabin by an unknown author from Maine caused the greatest stir of anything published in America since Thomas...

  • American History Magazine

    Quorum Busters

    Sometimes politicians go to extremes to avoid having to sit down and be counted. When the Democrats wanted Abraham Lincoln to sit down and be counted, Lincoln stood up, scooted to a window and jumped out. It was 1840, and Lincoln was an...

  • American History Magazine

    Over Here/Over There

    American painters like George Ault fought to make sense—and beauty—of a world at war. The world had exploded into chaos. A nation already staggering from the Great Depression was plunged into World War II, touching everyone, whether at...