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  • Aviation History Magazine

    Letter from Aviation History- July 2014

    After a year off due to federal sequester budget cuts, the U.S. military flight demo teams—the U.S. Navy Blue Angels and Air Force Thunderbirds—are back in action, thrilling crowds at major airshows across the country. The Blue Angels...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Rare Breed of Cat: The F6F-5

    The Flying Heritage Collection’s F6F-5 joins a handful of flying Hellcats. In June 1942, while the Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat was taking the Mitsubishi A6M2 Zero’s measure at Midway, Grumman was completing a successor designed to wrest the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Perils of Pearl: Pearl White Ward

    Pearl White Ward abandoned business school for the cockpit, then made a living jumping out of it. “I always told my mother I was going to make something of myself,” Pearl White Ward said in a 1997 interview in the Ritchie County...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Doak’s One-Off: The Doak VZ-4DA

    A rare VTOL bird demonstrated some promising flight characteristics, until it was sunk by the rise of the helicopter. The U.S. Army Transportation Museum at Fort Eustis, Virginia, might seem like an unlikely place to find a stable of...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: So I Bought an Airforce

    So I Bought An Airforce: The True Story of a Gritty Midwesterner in Somoza’s Nicaragua by W.W. Martin, Two Harbors Press, Minneapolis, Minn., 2013, $16.95 This is a book hard-working Americans will love. Will Martin takes us back to a...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: Hidden Warriors

    Hidden Warriors: The Epic Stories of Finding, Recovering and Rebuilding WWII’s Lost Aircraft by Nicholas A. Veronico, Zenith Press, Minneapolis, Minn., 2013, $30 While the rest of us savor static displays and airshow performances, Nick...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Warbirds Over the Beach: Military Aviation Museum

    After weathering a financial storm last year, the Military Aviation Museum’s airplanes are once again tearing up the skies over Virginia. Jerry Yagen is a man on a mission. Dressed in an Army-green flight suit over a blue shirt and tie,...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    German Giant: The Zeppelin Staaken R.VI

    The Zeppelin Staaken R.VI of World War I was the largest bomber ever to strike Britain. The name Zeppelin is usually associated with rigid lighter-than-air craft from the early 1900s through the 1930s, including the famous Graf Zeppelin...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Book Review: Area 51 Black Jets

    Area 51 Black Jets: A History of the Aircraft Developed at Groom Lake, America’s Secret Aviation Base by Bill Yenne, Zenith Press, Minneapolis, Minn., 2014, $40 Don’t look for little green men from another planet between these covers....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The First Ground-Pounders

    During World War I, Germany made a notable contribution toward the development of tactical air support for its armies struggling on the Western Front. By the close of 1914, the French, British and German armies on the Western Front had...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Letter from Aviation History- November 2014

    Few military aviation missions generate the spectrum of passions associated with close air support. Fighter-bomber pilots have typically performed such ground-attack missions with some reluctance, knowing that by flying low and slow...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The First Shturmovik

    The Germans beat the Russians in developing a ground-attack airplane—by an entire war. During World War I, few combat assignments were as dangerous and as disliked by aircrews as ground-attack missions. Strafing was certainly terrifying...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Restored: Diving into the Past

    Even riding in the back seat, the view from an SBD as it plummets to earth is unforgettable. One of World War II’s most significant airplanes, the Douglas SBD Dauntless was a major factor enabling the U.S. Navy to turn the tide of the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Heinemann’s Hot Rod

    In a world where the focus seems to shift daily from one technological wonder to another, the value of solid engineering—a design well thought-out and well executed—is too often overlooked. This is as true in jet aviation as it is...

  • World War II Magazine

    Time Travel: Yanks in Cambridge

    KNOWN FOR ITS UNIVERSITY AND SOARING GOTHIC MASTERPIECES, Cambridge, England, has much to offer visitors seeking antiquity and spectacle. Established in 1209, the campus occupies the center of town, where a maze of narrow streets winds its...

  • World War II Magazine

    Film Review: The Wind Rises

    The Wind Rises Directed by Hayao Miyazaki. 2 hours, 6 minutes. Animation. Opens February 21. ‘An airplane is a dream,” says dashing Giovanni Caproni to bespectacled Jiro Horikoshi, setting out this remarkable animated feature’s...