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Adventurers

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Naval Aces of World War I

    Naval Aces of World War I: Parts 1 and 2 by Jon Guttman, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, England, 2011 and 2012, $25.95 Most aviation enthusiasts are familiar with World War I’s land-based aces, but the top naval pilots are practically...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Balkan Top Gun

    South African pilot “Pat” Pattle’s star burned brightly over North Africa and Greece during his meteoric combat career. April 20, 1941: one week before Greece capitulated to German and Italian invaders. As waves of Luftwaffe Ju-88s...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Sentinel of Verdun

    One of the very first fighter aces, Jean Navarre terrorized the skies over France by day and the streets of Paris by night. To French infantrymen in Verdun’s trenches early in 1916, cow- ering under German artillery, machine guns,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Stocking Full of Frontier Adventure

    Clark B. Stocking put his life on the line many times as a soldier, scout, sheriff ’s deputy and shotgun messenger, yet he survived well into the 20th century and got a third chance with his first love. Most men went West during the...

  • American History Magazine

    Surrounded by Alligators

    While other Americans were gearing up for revolution in 1774, William Bartram waxed poetic about the natural wonders he encountered exploring the St. John’s River in East Florida. “The groves resound the unceasing cries of the...

  • American History Magazine

    Run, River, Run

    John Wesley Powell lost his right arm at Shiloh in the Civil War, but that didn’t affect his ambition. Self-schooled in geology and native cultures, he launched an expedition in 1869 to explore the canyon lands of Colorado. He set off...

  • American History Magazine

    Through an Iceberg Darkly

    Beauty and danger in Alaska. No American is more revered by conservationists than John Muir, and few have lived such a colorful life. Born in Scotland in 1838, Muir arrived in Portage, Wisc., with his family at age 11, and later attended...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Spin Control

    How pioneering pilots learned to escape the death spiral....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Wing and a Prayer

    Neil Armstrong’s flying career nearly ended soon after it started, when he was forced to eject from his F9F Panther over Korea....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Gunning for Yellowstone

    Betrayal and bloodshed beget America’s first national park. On a warm evening in August 1869, a group of five Piegan Indians turned up unannounced at the home of fur trader turned rancher Malcolm Clarke, 25 miles north of Helena in...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    ‘Lady Lindy’: The Remarkable Life of Amelia Earhart

    A tomboy who defied early-20th-century conventions, Earhart successfully crusaded for women pilots’ place in the sky. They called Amelia Earhart “Lady Lindy” after her first flight across the Atlantic. She was tall...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Adventure’s of Cap’n Crockett

    Like his legendary ancestor, Captain Cary Crockett made a name for himself as a fighting man, tasked with taming the Philippine frontier. Clouds of malarial mosquitoes swarmed and the air hung heavy with humidity that evening in 1904. It...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Tomboy of the Air

    Blanche Scott, America’s first female stunt pilot, made a lasting mark in aviation. The crowd watched as the fragile-looking biplane spiraled upward against the blue sky, its 35-hp engine straining as it climbed ever higher. At 4,000...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Fighter Group

    Fighter Group: The 352nd “Blue-Nosed Bastards” in World War II by Lt. Col. (Ret.) Jay A. Stout, Stackpole Books, Mechanicsburg, Pa., 2012, $28.95. When he came upon an Arado Ar-234 over Remagen Bridge on March 14, 1945, P-51 pilot Don...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: The Star of Africa

    The Star of Africa: The Story of Hans Marseille  by Colin D. Heaton and Anne-Marie Lewis, Zenith Press, Minneapolis, Minn., 2012, $30.  Though he died on September 30, 1942, the victim of a new Me-109G’s bad engine rather than...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Remembering Wally

    Before he became one of the Mercury Seven, irreverent astronaut Walter Schirra cut his teeth flying Navy fighters. Captain Walter M. Schirra Jr. was best known to the public as the fun-loving prankster of and when he died in May 2007 he...