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Adventurers

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Across the Hypersonic Divide

    The X-15 tested the limits of speed and altitude for winged aircraft, bridging the gap between the air and space ages....

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Nonstop to Hawaii By Air and Sea

    When Commander John Rodgers’ PN-9 ran low on fuel 400 miles short of his destination, like a good Navy man he rigged the flying boat and sailed the rest of the way. Two years before Charles Lindbergh made his epic solo flight across the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Bud Anderson

    Triple fighter ace and test pilot Bud Anderson is a legend in his own time. Like millions of other Depression-era kids who became enthralled with flight during aviation’s golden era, Clarence E. “Bud” Anderson Jr. grew up crazy about...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Hometown Heroine: Helen Richey

    Record-setting pilot Helen Richey fought for a spot in a man’s world. In the steel town of McKeesport, Pennsylvania, readers of the local Daily News stared in shock at the headline on January 8, 1947: “Helen Richey—McKeesport’s...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Modest Mal

    For airline pilot Mal Freeburg, handling in-flight emergencies was all in a day’s work. The bad news traveled fast on a beautiful afternoon at St. Paul’s Municipal Airport in April 1932. Sitting in Northwest Airway’s Minnesota...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Higher and Faster

    Higher and Faster: Memoir of a Pioneering Air Force Test Pilot by Robert M. White and Jack L. Summers, McFarland, Jefferson, N.C., 2010, $29.95 In July 1962 Robert M. White flew the X-15 to an altitude of 314,750 feet, becoming the...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    A Thousand Miles by Airship

    In 1910 an eccentric newspaperman, his crew and a cat set out from Atlantic City in a dirigible, aiming to make the first transatlantic crossing by air. W alter Wellman is hardly a household name today, but he made a significant...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    German Knight on the Russian Front

    Only battle wounds kept Gerhard Barkhorn, history’s second-ranked fighter pilot, from becoming the all-time ace of aces. Bailing out of a stricken fighter over open water is no picnic in the best of circumstances. Over the English...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Aviation History Book Review: Naval Aces of World War I

    Naval Aces of World War I: Parts 1 and 2 by Jon Guttman, Osprey Publishing, Oxford, England, 2011 and 2012, $25.95 Most aviation enthusiasts are familiar with World War I’s land-based aces, but the top naval pilots are practically...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Balkan Top Gun

    South African pilot “Pat” Pattle’s star burned brightly over North Africa and Greece during his meteoric combat career. April 20, 1941: one week before Greece capitulated to German and Italian invaders. As waves of Luftwaffe Ju-88s...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    The Sentinel of Verdun

    One of the very first fighter aces, Jean Navarre terrorized the skies over France by day and the streets of Paris by night. To French infantrymen in Verdun’s trenches early in 1916, cow- ering under German artillery, machine guns,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Stocking Full of Frontier Adventure

    Clark B. Stocking put his life on the line many times as a soldier, scout, sheriff ’s deputy and shotgun messenger, yet he survived well into the 20th century and got a third chance with his first love. Most men went West during the...

  • American History Magazine

    Surrounded by Alligators

    While other Americans were gearing up for revolution in 1774, William Bartram waxed poetic about the natural wonders he encountered exploring the St. John’s River in East Florida. “The groves resound the unceasing cries of the...

  • American History Magazine

    Run, River, Run

    John Wesley Powell lost his right arm at Shiloh in the Civil War, but that didn’t affect his ambition. Self-schooled in geology and native cultures, he launched an expedition in 1869 to explore the canyon lands of Colorado. He set off...

  • American History Magazine

    Through an Iceberg Darkly

    Beauty and danger in Alaska. No American is more revered by conservationists than John Muir, and few have lived such a colorful life. Born in Scotland in 1838, Muir arrived in Portage, Wisc., with his family at age 11, and later attended...

  • Aviation History Magazine

    Spin Control

    How pioneering pilots learned to escape the death spiral....