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19th Century

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Unintended Revolution

    Mexico’s war of independence started out as a coup and ended—thanks to a charismatic priest—with the creation of a nation. On August 25, 1810, Francisco Xavier Venegas de Saavedra, New Spain’s recently appointed viceroy,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Taking Tarragona

    In 1811, General Louis-Gabriel Suchet sought his marshal’s baton in the breach of a Spanish fortress. On the sweltering afternoon of Friday, June 28, 1811, French engineers surveyed the 10-meter- wide breach in the wall surrounding...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Reinventing the Battlefield

    America’s Civil War featured heavy rifle fire and entrenched combatants while the cavalry and artillery played subordinate roles. Battle was the defining characteristic of the American Civil War. Some authorities count as many as 10,000...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Gall’s Last Stand

    The Lakota Sioux chief earned his reputation as a fierce warrior and tactical genius at Killdeer Mountain, the battles of the Yellowstone, and Little Bighorn. But what role, if any, did he really play in Custer’s final act? On June 25,...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    The North’s Caustic Cartoonist

    Through his political illustrations, Thomas Nast became a powerful spin doctor who influenced public opinion and made presidents. When Ulysses S. Grant was asked to name the one American civilian who had the most impact on the course of...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Tennessee Turning Point Nathan B. Forrest

    Nathan B. Forrest took matters into his own hands at Ft. Donelson—and a legend was born. As his generals argued for surrender, Nathan Bedford Forrest fumed. To that point the neophyte cavalry commander had been the good soldier, obeying...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Review: The Tall Target

    The Tall Target (1951) Directed by Anthony Mann What do you get when you combine a classic film noir whodunit with a historical incident from the life of Abraham Lincoln? You get The Tall Target, director Anthony Mann’s dark rendition of...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Book Review: One Continuous Fight

    One Continuous Fight: The Retreat From Gettysburg and the Pursuit of Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia, July 4-14, 1863 by Eric Wittenberg, J. David Petruzzi and Michael F. Nugent, Savas Beatie, 2008, $34.95 There is absolutely no...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Book Review: Civil War on Pensacola Bay

    The Civil War on Pensacola Bay, 1861-1862 by John K. Driscoll, McFarland & Co., 2008, $55 As the secession winter of 1860-61 turned into spring, two sites—Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor and Fort Pickens on Pensacola Bay—emerged...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Book Review: Brandy Station 1863

    Brandy Station 1863: First Step Towards Gettysburg by Dan Beattie, Osprey, 2008, $19.95 Osprey Publishing seems to have hit on a winning formula with its “Campaign” series by presenting substantive narrative histories that are...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Review: Raintree County

    Raintree County (1957) Directed by Edward Dmytryk The behind-the-scenes drama of MGM’s lumbering adaptation of Ross Lockridge Jr.’s novel about the life and loves of a young, idealistic Indiana Hoosier in the years surrounding the...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Book Review: Lincoln at Peoria

    Lincoln at Peoria: The Turning Point by Lewis E. Lehrman, Stackpole Books, 2008, $29.95 For five years following his lone term as a U.S. congressman in 1847-49, Abraham Lincoln remained outside the political landscape. But as Lincoln...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    ACW Book Review: Operational Battlefield

    America’s Civil War: The Operational Battlefield 1861-1863  by Brian Holden Reid, Prometheus Books, 2008, $34.98 One can read extensively in Civil War historiography and not once come across the word “puerile.” Yet Brian Holden...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Dan Sickles Blowing Smoke

    Was wounded Dan Sickles coolly chomping that cigar as he was carried off the field at Gettysburg, or is it just a puffed-up tale? Every student of the Battle of Gettysburg knows the story—the intrepid Major General Dan Sickles, seemingly...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    Bleeding Kansas

    The Kansas-Nebraska Act turned peaceful prairies into battlegrounds. It can be argued that the Civil War actually began in 1854 when blood stained the prairie grass of the Kansas Territory. The American vs. American bloodshed started...

  • America's Civil War Magazine

    The Great Emancipator’s mass execution

    Abraham Lincoln permitted the hanging of dozens of rebellious Sioux. Abraham Lincoln was arguably the most merciful man ever to occupy the White House. In his first year as president, he had already earned a reputation for the liberal use...