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19th Century

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Uniforms, Arms, and Equipment

    Uniforms, Arms, and Equipment: The U.S. Army on the Western Frontier, 1880-1892 by Douglas C. McChristian, University of Oklahoma Press, Norman, 2007, two-volume set, $95. In a whopping sequel to his The U.S.Army in the West, 1870-1880:...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Tascosa

    Tascosa: Its Life and Gaudy Times by Frederick Nolan, Texas Tech University Press, Lubbock, 2007, $39.95.  A history of one of the West’s wildest but often overlooked frontier towns is long overdue, and English author Frederick...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Dead Outlaw Found Holding a ‘Frontier’ in His Death Grip

    Bob Hughes had a Model 1878 double-action Colt. Railroad detective William D. “Bill” Fossett and U.S. Express Company guard Jake Harmon began walking forward from the rear of the train once the shooting stopped and the smoke cleared on...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Christmas Frontier-Style

    Yes, Virginia City, there is a Santa Claus. On Christmas Day 1863 in Virginia City, Nevada, Mark Twain received a gift from a Miss Chase. “The diabolical box had nothing in it but a ghastly, naked, porcelain doll baby,” newspaperman...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Camels Go West: Forgotten Frontier Story

    The U.S. Army’s experiment of 150 years ago to use the cloven-footed, humped creatures on the Southwestern frontier didn’t last long, but camels left their mark in Western lore. In 1883 stories circulated throughout Arizona Territory...

  • American History Magazine

    For Us the Living

    When a nation in mourning looks to its president for comfort and courage, he must choose his words carefully. Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address is considered one of history’s great speeches, and it has gained an almost mythical...

  • American History Magazine

    America’s First Daredevil

    He was the Evel Knievel of his day, the man whose daring exploits drew massive crowds and fired imaginations across the country. Sam Patch lived a life of no particular distinction until his hobby of jumping from great heights into...

  • American History Magazine

    Strangers in Two Worlds

    For many children captured by Indians on Texas frontier, the greatest challenge was returning home. To the Editors of the San Antonio Herald: On the first day of January, 1870, the son of the undersigned was stolen by the Indians at or...

  • American History Magazine

    How Cricket Struck Out

    Thousands of fans poured into Hoboken’s Elysian Fields in 1859 for one of the biggest sporting events of the times: a cricket match between American and British teams. But by the turn of the century, cricket was on the losing side of a...

  • American History Magazine

    Lincoln’s Teenage Sculptor

    It was a confident 17-year-old art student named Vinnie Ream who boldly requested that the president of the United States pose for her while she honed her craft. Abraham Lincoln allowed the teenager 15 minutes per day to observe and sculpt...

  • American History Magazine

    Speaking American

    An 1816 church election threw fuel on a fiery national debate about immigrants, patriotism and the English language. In March 1816, Pennsylvania’s attorney general charged 59 German-American men with conspiring to harass and assault a...

  • American History Magazine

    Medal Diplomacy

    A collection of peace tokens given to American Indians sets a whopping new record at auction. In the field of American numismatics, collector and dealer John J. Ford Jr. was in a class by himself. By the time he died at age 81 on June 7,...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    CWT Book Review: Fields of Honor

    Fields of Honor: Pivotal Battles of the Civil War by Edwin Bearss, introduction by James M. McPherson, National Geographic, 2006, 448 pages, $28. Ed Bearss, perhaps the best known and certainly the most popular Civil War battlefield guide...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Mary Todd Lincoln’s Lost Letters

    Just found, 25 notes cast new light on the manic-depressed first lady. On July 2, 1863, while a ferocious battle raged between Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia and George Meade’s Army of the Potomac at Gettysburg, Mary...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Against All Odds

    Diehard Rebels refused to accept defeat, finding strength in God, rumor and their own version of reality. At the Battle of Nashville on December 16, 1864, Union Major General John Schofield helped annihilate General John Bell Hood’s Army...

  • Civil War Times Magazine

    Spring Hill: A Confederate Might Have Been

    During a late November 1864 night, the Confederate Army of Tennessee missed the chance to attack and destroy a retreating Union army near Spring Hill, Tennessee. As one Union general put it, the Federals’ narrow escape was akin to...