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18th Century

  • Military History Magazine

    Fallen Timbers, Broken Alliance

    When the new nation needed a soldier to fight Indians and build a standing army, it called on a man whose hard-charging style had earned him the nickname ‘Mad Anthony’ George Washington rarely lost his temper, but when he did, the...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: Forgotten Patriots

    Forgotten Patriots: The Untold Story of American Prisoners During the Revolutionary War Edwin G. Burrows, Basic Books, 384 pp., $27.50 After their victories at Brooklyn and Fort Washington in 1776, the British were “perplexed” about...

  • American History Magazine

    Ben Franklin’s Gift that Keeps on Giving

    Our nation’s founding inventor advanced the cause of democracy by devising a perpetual moneymaking scheme. In the spring of 1789, Benjamin Franklin was in his eighth decade and he knew he did not have long to live. Tormented by gout,...

  • American History Magazine

    Monticello: The House of the Future

    Inspired by the past, Thomas Jefferson created more than a classic American house. One day in 1757, a Virginia tobacco planter and surveyor named Peter Jefferson died, leaving thousands of hilly, wooded acres to his 14-year-old son,...

  • American History Magazine

    Thomas Jefferson’s Beautiful Mind

    A secret code that took more than 200 years to crack offers a unique glimpse into the creative genius of our most enigmatic Founding Father. Thomas Jefferson was as much of a connoisseur of secret codes as he was of fine wines. So in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Steuben Comes to America

    A Prussian captain’s discipline and vast military experience have had a lasting influence on the army of the United States. On February 24, 1778, Capt. Gen. George Washington, commander in chief of the Continental Army, rode out from the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Heroes in Coats, Breeches, and Cock’d Hats

    In The Death of General Wolfe, Benjamin West combined elements of national pride, historical accuracy, and Christian iconography to create a new image of the heroic. On September 13, 1759, British Maj. Gen. James Wolfe and his men drifted...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Revolution’s Band of Brothers

    Whether heroes or opportunists, the O’Brien family of privateers helped America launch its battle for independence. It was an unlikely setting for one of the American Revolution’s most celebrated naval engagements: a hamlet in a remote...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Valley Forge, Pennsylvania

    Few place names evoke such strong emotions in the American psyche as Valley Forge, site of the 1777– 78 winter encampment of Maj. Gen. George Washington’s Continental Army. Although it was just one of seven such Revolutionary War...

  • Military History Magazine

    What Made Redcoats So Tough?

    They won most major battles—while losing the American War of Independence. The way nations remember history is more important than strict truth, argued 19th century French writer Ernest Renan, and that is especially true where military...

  • American History Magazine

    The First: Emancipator

    Robert Carter III was a most unlikely herald of liberty. The grandson of the Virginia land baron Robert “King” Carter (who convinced colonial authorities to let masters amputate the toes of runaway slaves) inherited a 65,000-acre...

  • American History Magazine

    Patrick Henry vs. Big Government

    The fiery orator who inspired patriots to rise up against British tyranny later hurled his verbal thunderbolts at George Washington and the U.S. Constitution. The men who gathered in Richmond in June 1788 to decide whether Virginia would...

  • Military History, MH Issues

    January 2018 Table of Contents

    The January 2018 issue features a cover story about John Barry, widely acknowledged "Father of the U.S. Navy"...

  • MHQ Magazine

    To Catch a Traitor

    Recruited by George Washington to kidnap the turncoat Benedict Arnold, John Champe had to join the British himself to trap his man. On September 25, 1780, George Washington was scheduled to inspect West Point with Major General Benedict...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artists on War: If at First You Do Succeed

    John Trumbull painted three versions of The Sortie Made by the Garrison of Gibraltar. He always considered the first effort his best. THE AMERICAN Revolution culminated in failure for the British. But even as it was unfolding, Britain was...

  • Military History Magazine

    One Revolution, Two Wars

    Redcoats were not the only enemies of American Independence. The Declaration of Independence said that by July 1776 the time had come “for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another.” But the...