17th - 18th Century Archives | HistoryNet MENU

17th – 18th Century

  • Military History Magazine

    Frederick II

    Crazy, vindictive and nasty, but still great. Frederick II’s first act on assuming the throne of Prussia in 1740 was to take his state to war—a consequence, he later explained, of possessing a well-trained army, a full treasury and a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Military History Book Review: Bayonets for Hire

    Bayonets for Hire: Mercenaries at War, 1550–1789 by William Urban, Greenhill Books, London, 2007, $39.95. “No one likes mercenaries. Yet everyone has used them.” Thus the preface sets the tone for this study. Known for his works on...

  • American History Magazine

    One Nation Under God

    There is perhaps no more personal issue than religion, and there are few things that Americans will defend more passionately than their right to believe as they choose. Freedom of religion is the first right guaranteed in the Bill of...

  • American History Magazine

    Jamestown at 400: Digging for Truth

    Forget what you’ve learned about Pilgrims and Plymouth Rock. Stunning new archaeological evidence reveals that the real roots of American independence and the entrepreneurial spirit which drove it were thriving in Virginia’s Tidewater....

  • American History Magazine

    Medal Diplomacy

    A collection of peace tokens given to American Indians sets a whopping new record at auction. In the field of American numismatics, collector and dealer John J. Ford Jr. was in a class by himself. By the time he died at age 81 on June 7,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: Fighting Techniques of the Early Modern World

    Fighting Techniques of the Early Modern World, AD 1500-1763: Equipment, Combat Skills, and Tactics Christer Jørgenson, Michael F. Pavkovic, Rob S. Rice, Frederick C. Schneid, and Chris L. Scott, Thomas Dunne Books, 2005, 256 pages,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    European Power Projection

    Far from an inexorable march of conquest, Western Europe’s early military forays around the world rode an ebb and flow tide of mercantilism. During the period from 1500 to 1800, the nations of Western Europe burst onto the world stage...

  • MHQ Magazine

    How the French Won the American Revolution

    Decrepit ships, snarled signals, and indecision doomed the British at the Battle of the Virginia Capes and secured America’s independence. It is impossible to say who was more astounded that sunny morning of September 5, 1781, when...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Quelling a Pirate Revolt

    In 1718, a former British privateer finally brought Blackbeard and his cronies to bay. After 15 years of war and not 10 months of peace, British authorities realized they had a problem on their hands in the spring of 1714: a failed state...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Making of Marlborough

    John Churchill rose from modest means to become first Duke of Marlborough and the greatest general of his time. On the morning of August 13, 1704, an English general stood on a low hill overlooking a nondescript Bavarian village on the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Tipping Point at Poltava

    In 1709, after nine years of fighting, Peter the Great destroyed archrival Charles XII’s tough Swedish army— marking the rise of modern Russia. Sweden’s king, once considered invincible among European monarchs, lay helpless on a...

  • American History Magazine

    American History Book Review: A Mercy

    A Mercy Toni Morrison, Alfred A. Knopf, 167 pp., $23.95 To the collective American mind, pre-Revolutionary America is a sparsely populated expanse of raw, green land, shrouded in thick mist, primitive belief and barely concealed savagery....

  • Military History Magazine

    Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban: Father of the Fortress

    Vauban, France’s master engineer of the 17th Century, designed nearly 100 fortress for Louis XIV—and defined the form for the ages. Sébastien Le Prestre, who would earn renown as seigneur de Vauban and a marshal of France, was born in...

  • Military History Magazine

    Marlborough at Blenheim

    The Battle of Blenheim was among the most decisive, and most complex, battles in European history. Fought on Aug. 13, 1704, during the war of War of Spanish Succession (1701–14)—in which allied powers including Austria, England and the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Birth of German Militarism

    The legendary, victorious campaigns of the Great Elector, Frederick William I. Wordsworth famously wrote: “The child is father of the man.” Things happen to us, in other words, in childhood or even infancy that can affect us for the...

  • American History Magazine

    Cameo: Botanist John Bartram and His Passion for Plants

    John Bartram made a pastime and then a business of cataloging America flora...