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Table of Contents—October 2014 Wild West

Originally published by Wild West magazine. Published Online: July 31, 2014 
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FEATURES

A Tale of Two Sadies
By Roger Jay
Before she hooked up with Wyatt Earp for the rest of his life, Josephine Sarah "Sadie" Marcus knew something of John Behan and Arizona Territory bordellos.

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The Lawman From Laramie
By R.K. DeArment
Nathaniel Kimball Boswell looked more like a biblical prophet than a frontier police officer, but Wyoming Territory desperadoes knew to fear him.

A Carte de Visite of Billy the Kid
By Richard Weddle 
It's not another tintype of the Kid but the next best thing—a carte de visit that recently fetched plenty at Brian Lebel's Old West Show & Auction in Denver.

Taos Mutiny of 1855 
By Will and John Gorenfeld
Major George Blake knew the men of Company F, 1st U.S. Dragoons, were fighting mad. Problem was they wanted to fight him.

King Ranch: A Texas Dynasty
By Pat Decker Nipper 
Riverboat captain Richard King landed a stalwart wife, Henrietta, and built a Lone Star State ranch that was a giant in his lifetime and is even bigger today.

Five Haunted Western Saloons 
By Bob Stinson
It may be hard to picture paranormal activity in Western saloons, but we can at least share photos of five such spooky drinking holes. 

DEPARTMENTS  

Editor's Letter

Weider Reader
Excerpts from recent articles in other
Weider History Group titles

Roundup
Author Paul Lee Johnson wins a Six-
Shooter Award from the Wild West History Association for his October
2013 Wild West article "The Will of McLaury," author Gale Cooper wins
her "Billy the Kid" lawsuit, and authors Will and John Gorenfeld offer a U.S. dragoon Top 10 list.

Interview
By Johnny D. Boggs
Andrew R. Graybill discusses his book The Red and the White, the saga of a Montana family with connections to a little-remembered 1870 massacre.

Westerners
The old Palo Verde, Calif., general
store had much to offer, including
Cherry Cheer.

Indian Life
By Will and John Gorenfeld
When Winnebago warriors broke from
their Iowa reservation in the 1840s, an empathetic Captain Edwin Vose
Sumner was given the "serious duty"
of removing them in winter.

Pioneers and Settlers
By John Koster
Referred to only as "Bell," the black
man who guided Frederick Law
Olmsted to Yosemite in 1864, could
have been, the author argues, poet
James Madison Bell.

 

 

Gunfighters and Lawmen
By Adam James Jones
Felipe Nerio Espinosa, one of America's earliest recorded serial killers, went on an 1863 Colorado Territory killing spree, first with his brother and then a nephew.

Western Enterprise
By J.R. Sanders
In its cow-town days rough-and-tumble Dodge City had a roller-skating rink—as did Tombstone, Helena, El Paso and Cheyenne.

Ghost Towns
By Jim Pettengill
Colorado's biggest gold producer in the early 1880s, Summitville is now high and dry with about 30 weathered structures.

Collections
By Linda Wommack
New Mexico's Salmon Ruins and Heritage Park, while not as celebrated as Chaco Canyon, is another ancestral Puebloan site well worth a visit.

Guns of the West
By Lee A. Silva
Among the weapons Doc Holliday carried are an 1851 Navy Colt, a Colt double-action Lightning/Thunderer, a double-barreled shotgun and the "Hell Bitch."

Reviews
Shirley Ayn Linder considers books and movies that deal in some fashion with Earp/Holliday women. Plus reviews of recent books, including Linder's Doc Holliday in Film and Literature and the recent film A Million Ways to Die in the West.

Go West!
Nebraska's Chimney Rock pointed the way west.

 

ONLINE EXTRAS

Discussion:

A 2014 Western movie spoof suggests there were a million ways to die in the West. So far we've only counted 642, but we're still working on it. What do you consider the best and worst ways one could have died on the Western frontier (of a heart attack in bed with Sadie Mansfield has already been taken, and we won't say if that was best or worst)?

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