Table of Contents – March 2008 – America’s Civil War

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FEATURES

My 15 Minutes Out of the Attic
By Robert Lee Hodge
From the cover of Confederates in the Attic to a “Primetime Live” television feature, a reenactor
discovered the fleeting nature of fame.

The Magic of New Old Photographs
Claude Levet takes reenactors back 145 years by using wet-plate collodion photography, just as Mathew Brady Alexander Gardner and Timothy O’Sullivan did.

Runaway Slave on the Wisconsin-Canada Line
By Tobin Beck and Lance Herdegen
Carolyn Quarlls fled from St. Louis on July 4, 1842, traveling to Canada with aid from a new network of people dedicated to helping slaves find freedom.

Daniel Sickles: An Unlikely Union General
By Christopher Ryan Oates
Bouncing from success to ruin and back again through an endless series of scandals that included murder, Daniel Sickles rebuilt his reputation by raising troops for the Union.

Robert E. Lee Takes Center Stage
By Tom Boeche
Bold moves by new Confederate commander Robert E. Lee convinced his Union adversary, George McClellan, to give up plans for a siege of Richmond.

Watch That Finger! Raise Those Arms! Make Your Point!
By Allen C. Guelzo
The debates between Stephen Douglas and Abraham Lincoln showcased their differences in oratorical style as much as political substance.

DEPARTMENTS  

Letters

Open Fire!
Civil War News and History

On the Block

In the Halls of Congress
By Eric Etheir
The secessionist climate of winter 1860-61 led to Congress splitting 2 for 1.

Letter From America’s Civil War

Reviews
• Did Lincoln own slaves?
• War comes to central Louisiana
• Maps to understand Gettysburg

Struck!
Dan Sickles’ leg took on a celebrity life of its own after being struck by a cannonball at Gettysburg.

ONLINE EXTRAS

An Eyewitness Account of the Evacuation of Richmond During the American Civil War

Confederacy’s Canadian Mission: Spies Across the Border

Union Officer Julian Bryant: A Voice for Black Soldiers

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