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Military History Magazine Nominated for 2010 National Magazine Award

By Military History 
Originally published by Military History magazine. Published Online: March 10, 2010 
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The staff of Military History magazine strives to create an exceptional publication, a magazine that not only provides information but also gives our readers an enjoyable, satisfying cover-to-cover experience with each issue. The staff was understandably proud, then, to learn that the American Society of Magazine Editors has nominated Military History for one of its prestigious National Magazine Awards.

Sid Holt, Chief Executive of the American Society of Magazine Editors, today announced the finalists for the 45th annual National Magazine Awards. Among the 51 magazines nominated in 23 categories are 20 magazines with multiple nominations—led by New York and The New Yorker with 10 each and National Geographic with 7—and 8 never-before-nominated titles: Architect, The Boston Globe Magazine, The Boston Review, Food Network Magazine, Garden & Gun, Military History, Orion and Out.

Military History is one of five print titles nominated for General Excellence in the "under 100,000 circulation" category. The others are Aperture, Architect, The Paris Review, and San Francisco.

"Magazines have never been better," said Mr. Holt. "The depth of reporting, quality of writing, superior story telling and unparalleled service journalism in this year's National Magazine Awards finalists showcases the editorial strengths of our medium."

More than 300 magazines participated in the National Magazine Awards this year, submitting 1,758 entries. Military History is honored to be chosen a finalist in this select group.

The National Magazine Awards are known as the Ellies, for the Alexander Calder stabile "Elephant" given to each winner.


2 Responses to “Military History Magazine Nominated for 2010 National Magazine Award”


  1. 1
    ldkinfo says:

    The B-52 bomber has been in service for over 50 years demonstrating the soundness of its design. Early models featured a 20 mm multi-barrel cannon for defense. But its placement in the tail limited effectiveness, since incoming threats could approach from outside the cannon's field of fire. Against anti-aircraft missiles such as the Soviet SAM missile, manuevering, flares, and other passive defense measures were used but B-52s, AWACs and other large aircraft are not very agile and flares do nothing to destroy the threat or its source.
    AWACs with their massive radome are not very manoeuvrable and their critical importance in aircraft control would make it a high priority to destroy them early in a conflict. Fighter escorts to protect AWACs can be overloaded if a sufficient number of missiles, UAVs, fighters, or a combination of, are used with appropriate tactics to attack escort and AWAC at the same time.
    One way to increase defensive capabilities of B-52s, AWACs, etc. is to use fuselage or main wing mounted turrets, equipped with missiles instead of guns. The turret contains a missile launcher fed by a box-type magazine (i.e. pistol) that extends into the pylon supporting the turret. Turret doors similar in design to those used for telescope observatories open for missile launch and allow the missile launcher to be aimed at different elevations. The turret also houses a radar system that provides the option to use it to direct the missile towards the target until IR sensors lock or operate the turret independently of other turrets or human intervention to deal with multiple threats from different directions and altitude.
    The missile used to equip the radome-turret is comparable in size and performance to a portable shoulder-fired anti-aircraft missile. The effective range is less than larger missiles such as the Side-winder, but more than sufficient to prevent incoming threats armed with a conventional warhead or cannon getting close enough to be effective. Any advantage gained in using longer range missiles to deal with multiple threats is offset by the turret's ability to rapidly position and fire a multiple number of lower cost missiles.

  2. 2
    Travis Thorpe says:

    I found a great website for military history and the American civil war. http://www.wig-wags.com It was created by a graduate student studying Military history.



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