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Interview with Antony Beevor

Antony Beevor taps battlefield voices to cast a fresh eye on D-Day in his new book, D-Day: The Battle for Normandy.
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Interview with Jeff Shaara

Jeff Shaara didn’t plan to follow in his novelist father’s footsteps, but began to write a string of bestselling novels from the Revolution to World War I. He tackled World War II in a series of books, the most recent of which appears in November.
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Interview with Laurence Rees

Award-winning historian and producer Laurence Rees, creator of the BBC documentary series and book Auschwitz: The Nazis and the “Final Solution”, is no stranger to the war’s moral quandaries. But his latest dual-media project—a book, World War II Behind Closed Doors: Stalin, the Nazis, and the West, and a series of the same name now airing on PBS—places the 1940 Soviet massacre of Poles at Katyn into chilling contexts: how Stalin played Roosevelt and Churchill, how they tried to play him, and what happened to the Poles and their country.
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Interview with Andrew Roberts

Andrew Roberts, author of Masters and Commanders, burrowed through archival documents for the inside scoop on the relationships between Winston Churchill, FDR, George C. Marshall, and Alan Brooke.
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Interview with Ian Kershaw

“Hitler,” says Ian Kershaw, “had a deep-seated, lasting sense of revenge—something you don’t come across in history too often.” In Hitler, his magisterial two-volume biography now condensed into one, Kershaw caps 30 years of studying the führer and Nazi Germany in key works like The ‘Hitler Myth’: Image and Reality in the Third Reich and Hitler, the Germans, and the Final Solution. Here he painstakingly traces the many tangled contexts—historical, psychological, cultural—that enabled this incurious narcissist’s rise to power on the wings of revenge, and culminated in the horrors of World War II.
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Interview with Carlo D’Este

To get the brilliant Churchill,” says Carlo D’Este, “you had to take the human, flawed Churchill, the man obsessed with making something of himself.” In Warlord: A Life of Winston Churchill at War, 1874–1945, D’Este, a retired U.S. Army lieutenant colonel and acclaimed military historian (Bitter Victory: The Battle for Sicily, 1943) and biographer (Patton: A Genius for War and Eisenhower: A Soldier’s Life), looks at Britain’s fabled leader through a revealing lens.
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Interview with Efraim Zuroff

As director of the Simon Wiesenthal Center’s Jerusalem office, American-born Israeli historian Efraim Zuroff coordinates the center’s worldwide effort to locate Nazi war criminals and bring them to justice. He has not only tracked down those who helped perpetrate the Holocaust, but also convinced often-hesitant governments to prosecute them. In 2002 Zuroff helped launch Operation Last Chance, which offers financial rewards in exchange for information leading to the identification and prosecution of war criminals living in Europe, the Balkans, and South America. He also writes the center’s annual status report, which lists the most wanted Nazis still at large and grades individual nations on their willingness and determination to prosecute identified war criminals.
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Interview with Alex Kershaw

Alex Kershaw’s latest book, Escape from the Deep, tells the suspense-driven story of the USS Tang, the high-killing navy submarine sunk by its own torpedo during a late 1944 “unrestricted warfare” run near Formosa.
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Interview with Paul Shapiro

For the last few years, Paul Shapiro, director of the Center for Advanced Holocaust Studies at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, has helped lead a campaign to make documents of the International Tracing Service (ITS) available to the public. Created by the Allies in 1943 to help repatriate people displaced by World War II, ITS grew into an immense archive of materials from Gestapo offices, prisons, and police stations.
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Interview with Pete Hamill

Pete Hamill edited A. J. Liebling: World War II Writings, a 1,090-page anthology, including previously uncollected work, from the legendary New Yorker correspondent.