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World War II

World War II magazine is about the leaders, battles, weapons & men who fought in history’s greatest conflict. Our magazine utilizes dramatic photographs, illustrations, and detailed maps and graphics to bring to life the stories of famous leaders and unsung men and women, the stories of battles and weapons in the world’s greatest conflict.




  • World War II Magazine

    What if: the Japanese high command had refused to surrender

    By the summer of 1945, Japan had, by every reasonable standard, lost the war. The American juggernaut had destroyed its navy, breached its island defenses, choked its economy, and fire bombed its cities. Yet the Japanese government...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Pacific Storm- Allies

    When it was released in 2006, Pacific Storm was quickly recognized as one of the most challenging and original World War II– themed real-time strategy games of that year. It revolutionized strategy gaming by allowing the player to take a...

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    WWII Review: The Counterfeiters

    The Counterfeiters (2007)  Director: Stefan Ruzowitzky. Time: 98 minutes. Color. Subtitles.  Think of The Counterfeiters as a cross between Schindler’s List and Stalag 17 with a dash of Downfall— a twisting noir thriller that...

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    WWII Book Review: Bradley

    Bradley By Alan Axelrod. 224 pp. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. $21.95. Omar Bradley was the cautious general. He avoided unnecessary risks and always considered logistics before moving forward. This was a far cry from the aggressive,...

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    WWII Book Reviews: Pacifist, Pundit Blame Churchill for War

    Human Smoke: The Beginnings of World War II, the End of Civilization By Nicholson Baker. 576 pp. Simon & Schuster, 2008. $30. Churchill, Hitler, and the Unnecessary War: How Britain Lost Its Empire and the West Lost the World By...

  • World War II Magazine

    The Italian Impostor Who Conned FDR

    Virgilio Scattolini may not have been the biggest liar ever to walk the face of the earth. But he was certainly the biggest liar ever to have his lies regularly and avidly read by the president of the United States. While he was riding...

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    The Desert Site That Was Barren, Desolate—and Just Right

    When Col. Paul Tibbets flew over Wendover Field in September 1944 in search of a remote, secure place where he could train the B-29 crews he handpicked to drop the atomic bomb, he looked down from thirty thousand feet and declared it...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- September 2008

    A Wartime Mystery Solved: ‘I Shot Down Saint-Exupéry’ When Antoine de Saint- Exupéry took off from Corsica on July 31, 1944, in an American-made P-38 reconnaissance plane, he was known for many things: as the author of The Little...

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    WWII Letters from Readers- September 2008

    The GI with Eight Good Fingers I just received a phone call from a fellow in Lake Park, Georgia, who had an interesting story to tell. It concerns a photo on page 50 of my story about V-Discs in the July/August 2007 issue (“Free Records,...

  • World War II Magazine

    What if: Germany Had Invaded England?

    For individuals in countries that have escaped military invasion and occupation, imagining what such an ordeal would have been like can be a popular pastime. In the 1970s, armchair generals could play “Invasion: America,” a board game...

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    WWII Book Review: Leningrad

    Leningrad: State of Siege By Michael K. Jones. 352 pp. Basic Books, 2008. $27.95. The first thing that registers when one visits St. Petersburg’s (formerly Leningrad’s) Piskarevskoye Memorial Cemetery is its immense size. The second...

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    WWII Book Review: Bill Mauldin

    Bill Mauldin: A Life Up Front By Todd DePastino. 320 pp. W. W. Norton, 2008. $27.95. The two most famous American combat soldiers of World War II never existed. To millions of stateside readers and, most importantly, to GIs in foxholes...

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    WWII Book Reviews: Atomic Controversy

    Atomic Tragedy: Henry L. Stimson and the Decision to Use the Bomb Against Japan By Sean L. Malloy. 233 pp. Cornell University Press, 2008. $26.95. Hiroshima: The World’s Bomb By Andrew J. Rotter. 368 pp. Oxford University Press, 2008....

  • World War II Magazine

    Rocket Dreaming

    Ill-fated efforts to build rocket-powered fighters gave wartime aviation visionaries a humbling lesson in going nowhere fast. On the early afternoon of May 29, 1944, Flight Lt. G. R. Crakanthorp rolled his Spitfire Mk XI reconnaissance...

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    Babe in Arms

    War and life in Hitler’s Germany through the eyes of an eight-year-old. “You, my youth, are our nation’s most precious guarantee for a great future,” Hitler exhorted a crowd of 80,000 children assembled in Nuremberg on September...

  • World War II Magazine

    Churchill’s Secret Army

    Britain’s last resort against a Nazi invasion was a guerrilla force trained to carry out suicidal missions of terror and sabotage. If Adolf Hitler’s threat to invade Great Britain in the summer of 1940 was a bluff, it was a bluff...