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World War II

World War II magazine is about the leaders, battles, weapons & men who fought in history’s greatest conflict. Our magazine utilizes dramatic photographs, illustrations, and detailed maps and graphics to bring to life the stories of famous leaders and unsung men and women, the stories of battles and weapons in the world’s greatest conflict.




  • World War II Magazine

    Eisenhower’s Rabbi, Who Saved the Survivors

    Not many lieutenant colonels would have dared blow the whistle on Gen. George S. Patton Jr.—but then not many lieutenant colonels had seen what Judah Nadich had, at least not with eyes that remained so undulled to moral outrage and yet...

  • World War II Magazine

    Conversation with David Stafford

    In 2004, British historian David Stafford’s Ten Days to D-Day: Citizens and Soldiers on the Eve of the Invasion tracked Normandy through ten participants, focusing less on leaders and heroics than on the period’s murky uncertainties....

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Today- March 2008

    American Who Infiltrated the Manhattan Project for the Soviets Honored in Russia  It could have been a heart- warming American success story. Born and raised in Iowa, George Koval graduated from Sioux City’s Central High School in...

  • World War II Magazine

    What if: the British Hadn’t Bombed Hamburg?

    During 1943 the RAF’s Bomber Command fought three aerial campaigns in the night skies over Nazi Germany: the Battle of the Ruhr (March through June), the Battle of Hamburg (July 24–25 to August 2–3), and the Battle of Berlin...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Company of Heroes- Opposing Fronts

    One of the best-reviewed games of 2006, Company of Heroes was destined to become a franchise. With its immersive gameplay, complex intraunit relationships, and innovative supply-line-resource-gathering concept, it was arguably one of the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: The Holy See and Hitler’s Germany

    The Holy See and Hitler’s Germany By Gerhard Besier. 272 pp. Palgrave Macmillan, 2007. $35. Densely packed and often less-than-elegantly translated, this rewarding exercise in historiography draws extensively on documents held in the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Review: Untold Stories of the Tuskegee Airmen

    Untold Stories of the Tuskegee Airmen Director: Tom Rubeck Time: 51 minutes. Color/B&W. In 2007, the surviving members of the famed Tuskegee Airmen, a group of African American aviators and ground personnel who overcame discrimination...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Ted Williams at War

    Ted Williams at War By Bill Nowlin. 368 pp. Rounder Books, 2007. $24.95. Bill Nowlin may have stepped to the plate once too often. As the author or editor of more than a dozen books on Ted Williams, Nowlin has faced the task of finding the...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: The Forger

    The Forger: An Extraordinary Story of Survival in Wartime Berlin By Cioma Schönhaus. 220 pp. Da Capo, 2008. $23. If this were fiction, it could be a coming-of-age adventure tale like Tom Sawyer or Huckleberry Finn—with some vicious...

  • World War II Magazine

    WWII Book Review: Stalingrad

    Stalingrad: How the Red Army Survived the German Onslaught By Michael K. Jones. Foreword by David M. Glantz. 320 pp. Casemate, 2007. $32.95. A Red Army veteran once told this reviewer, “If you dig down anywhere in Volgograd, just pick a...

  • World War II Magazine

    A Daring Rescue Behind the Lines

    Operation Halyard weathered fierce British opposition, communist sabotage, and the threat of Nazi discovery to become one of the most successful rescue missions of World War II. Black flak bursts blossomed in the air around Lt. Thomas...

  • World War II Magazine

    Operation Starvation

    A brilliant synergy between air and sea came close to defeating Japan even before the atomic bombs. Late on the afternoon of March 27, 1945, 102 four-engine Boeing B-29s clattered aloft from Tinian, rising ponderously from the island and...

  • World War II Magazine

    Fight to the Finish on Leyte

    MacArthur’s strategic blunders in taking Leyte were matched only by the Japanese army’s miscalculations. Gen. Tomoyuki Yamashita had intended to fight his main battle for the defense of the Philippines on Luzon. Yet he found his...

  • World War II Magazine

    Lawrence of Morocco

    In his memoirs, the anthropologist Carleton Coon wanted to set one thing straight: The explosives his team of Arab saboteurs used to blow up German tanks were not, as Time magazine once erroneously reported, fake camel turds. They were...

  • World War II Magazine

    Harsh Winds Shake the Dust from Manzanar’s Past

    Back in the early 1950s, when I was a high school student in Oregon, our American history teacher told us a sad story of how the civil rights we take for granted can disappear in time of war. Barely a decade earlier, just after Pearl...

  • World War II Magazine

    Conversation with Pete Hamill

    Two Legendary Journalists, a Generation Apart, on the Art of War Reporting Pete Hamill was born to Irish immigrants in Brooklyn in 1935, the oldest of seven children. At age six teen he left school for the Brooklyn Navy Yard and...