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Wild West

True history, lore & culture of the great American frontier from its beginnings to today. America’s western frontier has been a vital part of the country’s myths and reality, from the earliest exploration beyond the territory of the first colonies, to the wide expanses of the western prairies and deserts. Wild West brings to life the fascinating history, lore and culture of the great American frontier.




  • Wild West Magazine

    The Past Comes Alive at Deadwood Museum

    The Adams Museum tells the story of Wild Bill. The summer of 1876 was fateful for the Black Hills mining camp of Deadwood (in Dakota Territory, now South Dakota). Its most famous visitor, gambler and former lawman Wild Bill Hickok, was...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Ghost Town: St. Elmo, Colorado

    In 1875 prospector Dr. Abner Ellis Wright struck gold in Colorado’s remote Chalk Creek Canyon, discovering the vein that would yield the Mary Murphy Mine and support St. Elmo for 50 years. In spring 1880, Griffith Evans and several...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Cowboy Rock Art of Tinchera Pass

    At a remote geographical site in southeast Colorado called ‘the Wall,’ some of the pictographs decorating the south side were created by cattle drovers, not Indians. In the American West, many examples can be found of ancient carvings...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Out of the West, Into the Western

    Among the real-life Wild West characters who went reeling into moving pictures were Buffalo Bill Cody, William Tilghman, Al Jennings, Emmett Dalton and Henry Starr. There was a twilight time in the early 20th century when, as the sun was...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Mo-chi: First Female Cheyenne Warrior

    Also known as Buffalo Calf Woman, she survived the attacks by soldiers at Sand Creek in 1864 and the Washita River in 1868 and vowed vengeance against those who murdered her family and her people. On a bitter cold November day on the...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The Making of Wyatt Earp’s Legend

    Wyatt Earp spent his last years trying to set the record straight on the story of his life. His biographer Stuart Lake had something more in mind: He was going to create the Icon of the American West. But the legend might never have been...

  • Wild West Magazine

    As Good As Little ‘Bits,’ Tokens Were a Big Hit

    In saloons, tokens were convenient and valuable. Tokens, coinlike objects that have a stated or implied value in trade, originated in the Ancient World, were used in Colonial America and are sometimes still used today in arcades, slot...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Cheyenne Women Honor Tradition

    Mo-chi did, too, although she was unique. Mo-chi, known as the first female Cheyenne warrior, was hardly typical of the women in her tribe. Cheyenne women didn’t usually fight alongside their husbands in battle or on raids, and they...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Mary Schwandt’s Ordeal During the Sioux Uprising

    Her family fell, and she was captured. Of the many personal stories from the 1862 Sioux Uprising in Minnesota, none is more emblematic of the experience of the recently arrived settlers than that of Mary Schwandt. Kidnapped at age 14, she...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Pinkerton Operative John Fraser Served Half a Century

    He worked on the Fountain murder case. Historian C.L. Sonnichsen introduced Pinkerton operative J.C. Fraser to his readers during his coverage of the disappearance of Colonel Albert J. Fountain in Tularosa: Last of the Frontier West, first...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Interview: Fountains’ Disappearance Still Attracts Attention

    The murder case lives on in Corey Recko’s book. Attorney Albert J. Fountain and his 8-year-old son, Henry, disappeared somewhere in the White Sands of southeastern New Mexico Territory in February 1896. Ambush and murder were suspected,...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Review: The Real West

    The Real West: Cowboys and Outlaws Greystone Communications, Inc., and A&E Television Networks, 2007 DVD format (produced 1993-94), eight 45-minute episodes, $17.95. The Real West aired on A&E from 1992 to 1994, and its success...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Ghost Towns and Mining Districts

    Ghost Towns and Mining Districts of Montana by Terry Halden, Old Butte Publishing, Butte, Mont., 2007, $24.95. A native Montanan with a smile as large as the Big Sky once took me into the hills of Granite County to show me the goldmining...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Driven Out

    Driven Out: The Forgotten War Against Chinese Americans by Jean Pfaelzer, Random House, New York, 2007, $27.95. The discovery of gold in California in January 1848 attracted hordes of prospectors, entrepreneurs and workers, but not all...

  • Wild West Magazine

    Wild West Book Review: Nantan

    Nantan: The Life and Times of John P. Clum, Volume 1, Claverack to Tombstone 1851-1882 by Gary Ledoux, Trafford Pub., Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 2007, $39 paperback. Although his Tombstone Epitaph office was only a few feet away...

  • Wild West Magazine

    The West Goes Pop

    Andy Warhol created a West portfolio a year before his death. Andy Warhol may be better known for his cans of Campbell’s Soup and his Marilyn Monroes, but his penchant for making Pop Art out of America’s national myths also drew him to...