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Military History


Land, naval & air warfare from ancient times to the late 20th century. Military History is the nation’s oldest and most popular magazine devoted to the history of warfare. Each issue contains incisive accounts from top writers and historians who take a fresh look at the commanders, campaigns, battles, and weapons that made history.

Military History


Why Rome Fell

Richard A. Gabriel | Published: July 03, 2013 at 2:30 pm
The vast empire that reigned supreme for more than two millennia crumbled in just a few short centuries

Letter From Military History - September 2013

Michael W. Robbins | Published: July 03, 2013 at 1:33 pm
The postwar "blame game" is a simplistic way to form order out of chaos, but it ultimately leads to a distortion of the complicated, real-life history of what happened.

Zeiss Scherenfernrohr: Ears Like a Donkey—Eyes Like a Hawk

Jon Guttman | Published: July 03, 2013 at 12:28 pm
The 8- to 10-power Zeiss Scherenfernrohr prism binoculars enabled observers to track enemy movements without putting themselves in the direct line of fire.

Webley & Scott Mk VI Revolver: The British Officer’s Man-Stopper of Choice

Jon Guttman | Published: July 03, 2013 at 12:14 pm
The Webley & Scott Mk VI top-break revolver was a versatile weapon, designed with trench warfare in mind, that remained popular with British officers through World War II.

Military History - September 2013 - Letters From Readers

Published: July 03, 2013 at 11:52 am
Readers' letters in the September 2013 issue of Military History sound off about the 1950 Battle of the Chosin Reservoir, the 1983 invasion of Grenada, military camouflage and wartime surgery.

Elco PT Boat: 80 Feet of Wood and Weaponry

Jon Guttman | Published: May 01, 2013 at 4:22 pm
Of the nearly 400 fast, light and heavily armed patrol boats Elco made for the U.S. Navy during World War II, a few achieved notoriety and one survives today as a museum ship.

Studebaker Wagon: The Studie That Served on the Front Lines

Jon Guttman | Published: May 01, 2013 at 4:15 pm
By 1867 the Studebaker brothers had provided the U.S. Army with 6,000 vehicles, including supply wagons, gun caissons and ambulances.

The Making of General Winfield Scott

Ron Soodalter | Published: May 01, 2013 at 4:05 pm
The young officer survived court-martial, a duel and the War of 1812 to become one of America’s greatest commanders

Book Review: Invisible Armies, by Max Boot

HistoryNet Staff | Published: May 01, 2013 at 3:39 pm
Invisible Armies, by author-historian Max Boot, is an authoritative and superbly written examination of the evolution of guerrilla warfare and its close cousin, terrorism.

Book Review: The Zimmermann Telegram, by Thomas Boghardt

HistoryNet Staff | Published: May 01, 2013 at 3:38 pm
In his new book historian Thomas Boghardt examines just what impact the Zimmerman Telegram had on America's decision to formally enter into World War I.

Book Review: Napalm, by Robert M. Neer

HistoryNet Staff | Published: May 01, 2013 at 3:37 pm
In Napalm: An American History, author Robert Neer describes how this World War II invention came to be regarded as archetype of inhumane weapons.

Interview With Author-Historian Geoffrey Parker

Published: May 01, 2013 at 12:57 pm
Parker's research links global climate change to widespread warfare in the 17th century. (Jussi Puikkonen/KNAW)In his big new book, Global Crisis: War, Climate Change and Catastrophe in the 17th Century, distinguished historian Geoffrey Parker addresses a very big subject: …

Military History - July 2013 - Letters From Readers

Published: May 01, 2013 at 11:48 am
Readers' letters in the July 2013 issue of Military History sound off about camouflage and a 'Chia Tank,' the Chosin Reservoir, Lithuania's Forest Brothers, the Davy Crockett atomic cannon and Sir Francis Drake.

Letter From Military History - July 2013

Michael W. Robbins | Published: May 01, 2013 at 10:01 am
Military history is not just a chronicle of organized violence; it is also a history of the development of human organizations and the effects of ideas on human behavior.

Canon de 75 modèle 1897: France’s 'Black Butcher'

Jon Guttman | Published: February 28, 2013 at 12:14 pm
The French 75 made its mark in 1914 at First Marne, then echoed around the world in various versions.

Macedonian Sarissa: Spartan-Hunting Spear of Philip II

Jon Guttman | Published: February 28, 2013 at 12:01 pm
The sarissa formed the spines of the bristling Macedonian phalanx.
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