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Military History

Land, naval & air warfare from ancient times to the late 20th century. Military History is the nation’s oldest and most popular magazine devoted to the history of warfare. Each issue contains incisive accounts from top writers and historians who take a fresh look at the commanders, campaigns, battles, and weapons that made history.




  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Kasserine Pass

    The February 1943 Battle of the Kasserine Pass marked the first serious confrontation between America’s amateur army and Germany’s professional Wehrmacht— specifically the elite Afrika Korps— so it should come as no surprise the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: A Multitude of Heroes

    Lieutenant John Chard Royal Engineers Victoria Cross Rorke’s Drift, Natal January 22 and 23, 1879 Queen Victoria called the 1879 British defense of Rorke’s Drift “immortal,” and a modern historian labeled it “one of the best...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Balaklava, Ukraine

    I had read accounts of the October 1854 Battle of Balaklava— the most famous combat action of the Crimean War—since my childhood. I knew the theory of how Britain’s Light Brigade had galloped to its destruction because of muddled...

  • Military History Magazine

    Zhukov: What Made Him Great?

    Tough, tenacious and a master of combined-arms warfare, he was also adept at politics and publicity. What made Georgy Konstantinovich Zhukov a great general? Simply put, he was the greatest Soviet commander of World War II because he...

  • Military History Magazine

    Europe’s Powder Keg

    When small Balkan nations took on Ottoman Turkey, they lit the fuze of world war. On Nov. 17, 1912, a 22-year-old American adventurer and would-be war correspondent named Henry Weston Farnsworth stood atop a low hill some 20 miles west of...

  • Military History Magazine

    Sébastien Le Prestre de Vauban: Father of the Fortress

    Vauban, France’s master engineer of the 17th Century, designed nearly 100 fortress for Louis XIV—and defined the form for the ages. Sébastien Le Prestre, who would earn renown as seigneur de Vauban and a marshal of France, was born in...

  • Military History Magazine

    Decisions: To Cross the River

    George Washington won the Revolutionary War in part because of his ability to consider military problems from multiple angles. Unlike some other generals, he understood that success depended not just on tactics, firepower and supply, but...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: From Canada, 1775

    Battles are often lost in the conception of them, and Continental Army Colonel Benedict Arnold’s attempt to drive the British out of Canada in 1775 was one such occasion. The idea was not a bad one: He and Ethan Allen had already seized...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: Finding the Lost Battalion

    Harold Goettler Erwin Bleckley U.S. Army Medal of Honor Argonne, France October 5, 1918 The plight of the Lost Battalion is one of the most famous incidents of America’s involvement in World War I. For six harrowing days in early October...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Hartmannswillerkopf, France

    Hartmannswillerkopf is a 3,136-foot rocky spur on the eastern ridge of the Vosges Mountains in France’s Alsace region. Site of one of the least known of the major World War I battles, it is also one of the most impressive and remarkably...

  • Military History Magazine

    Meet the Freikorps

    We traditionally think of soldiering as a temporary occupation. Wars begin, men join up, and they fight for the duration. When the struggle is over, they return to their homes and their loved ones and get on with their lives. The model in...

  • Military History Magazine

    William Jones-Secretary Who?

    Though virtually forgotten by history, William Jones was instrumental in creating the U.S. Navy that stunned Britain’s Royal Navy in the War of 1812. Naval history is replete with stirring tales of brave captains and stalwart crews, of...

  • Military History Magazine

    Patrick Chauvel: An Eye for War

    The French photography shot his first war at age 18 and has spent his life depicting the realities of combat. When he was 17 years old, Patrick Chauvel decided he wanted to witness combat firsthand. His uncle, a war photographer during...

  • Military History Magazine

    A World of Hurt

    Long-forgotten explosives continue to wreak havoc around the globe. The farm workers had spent a long, hot day harvesting chili peppers in Battambang province, hard against Cambodia’s border with Thailand. They were riding home on a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Decisions: Landing at Inchon, 1950

    Few major victories have generated as much controversy as the Sept. 15, 1950, invasion of Inchon, South Korea; but then, few American military leaders have sparked such debate as General Douglas A. MacArthur. At Inchon he gambled on an...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: From Chippawa (1814)

    During the American Revolution the federal government was fixated on capturing Canada. In the decades following the war the British sent their Indian allies on raids south of the border, and with the 1812 declaration of the “Second War...