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Military History

Land, naval & air warfare from ancient times to the late 20th century. Military History is the nation’s oldest and most popular magazine devoted to the history of warfare. Each issue contains incisive accounts from top writers and historians who take a fresh look at the commanders, campaigns, battles, and weapons that made history.




  • Military History Magazine

    The Highest Recognition: Private Johnson Beharry

    Private Johnson Beharry British Army Victoria Cross Al ‘Ama¯rah, Iraq May 1 and June 11, 2004 “Some days you the bug, some days you the windshield,” was the way Caribbean-born British army Private Johnson Beharry put it. In Iraq he...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Wereth, Belgium

    In December 1944 German forces surged through the Ardennes region of Belgium, France and Luxembourg in what was to be their penultimate major offensive against the Allies in Western Europe. Adolf Hitler masterminded Rhein (Operation Watch...

  • Military History Magazine

    Mexico’s Irish Army

    Seeking to escape ignoble lives in their homeland, Irishmen of the Saint Patrick’s Battalion risked the hangman’s rope to fight in the Mexican War. On the morning of Sept. 10, 1847, as dawn broke over the Mexican village of San Ángel,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Alvin York: Hero of the Argonne

    In northern France in 1918 this humble American rifleman from rural Tennessee set aside his boyhood ideals to wage a one-man battle. U.S. Army Corporal Alvin C. York gained hero status—becoming one of the most acclaimed American soldiers...

  • Military History Magazine

    Taking Crimea… Again

    Armies from antiquity to the present day have wrangled over this patch of ground in the Black Sea but why? The three key principles of the real estate business, the saying goes, are “location, location, location.” The style of a home,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Shaka Zulu: Africa’s Napoleon?

    The warrior-king was a loyal son, a fearsome fighter, and master tactician, a ruthless tyrant, a national-hero—and in the end largely the stuff of myth. He came out of nowhere to lead his people to greatness. But while Shaka Zulu has...

  • Military History Magazine

    Letter from Military History- September 2014

    The Certainty of War Armed conflict has always been—and, sadly, will continue to be —a recurring theme in human society. Whether comprising clashes between rival clans of hunter-gatherers, nascent city-states or multinational...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from the Rebel Raiders

    Among the Confederacy’s most successful responses to the Anaconda Plan—the Union’s Civil War strategy to blockade Southern ports and simultaneously advance down the Mississippi River to cut the Confederacy in two—was guerre de...

  • Military History Magazine

    To Die Standing Up: Staff Sgt. Forrest L. Vosler

    Staff Sgt. Forrest L. Vosler U.S. Army Air Forces Medal of Honor Bremen, Germany December 20, 1943 Cut off from its formation and badly damaged by flak and enemy fighter attacks, the Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress Jersey Bounce Jr. was...

  • Military History Magazine

    Letters from Readers- Military History September 2014

    History’s Worst Weapons Re. “10 of History’s Worst Weapons, by Stephan Wilkinson, May: I was somewhat surprised to see that the Mark 14 torpedo made the list. As a young man of 18 I enlisted in the U.S. Navy in 1976. After recruit...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Columbus, New Mexico

    In the predawn darkness of March 9, 1916, several hundred armed Mexican horsemen crossed the border into the United States to attack the unsuspecting garrison town of Columbus, N.M. What ensued, just 3 miles north of the boundary, was a...

  • Military History Magazine

    Bloody Culloden, 1746

    This close-quarters clash on a windswept moor would challenge the Scottish clan tradition and direct the course of British rule. On a frigid, rainy day in mid-April, on a windswept, boggy moor five miles east of Inverness, Scotland, some...

  • Military History Magazine

    Allenby Captures Jerusalem

    The British General’s muted entry through the Jaffa Gate as the tidewater moment in his well-conceived and hard-fought campaign for Palestine. In June 1917, amid another round of distressing news from the Western Front, British Prime...

  • Military History Magazine

    Sideshow on the Danube

    Kutuzov has spent most of military career fighting the Turks. On April 1, 1811, one-eyed General Mikhail Illarionovich Kutuzov arrived in Bucharest to take command of Russia’s army in Moldavia and Wallachia. An exhausting and indecisive...

  • Military History Magazine

    Taming Chechnya

    What seemed a simple intervention to the Russian Army in 1994 quickly turned into a bloodbath with lessons for another war. Forty years after emerging victorious from World War II, the massive, well-equipped Soviet army dominated much of...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from Marathon, 490 BC

    In the summer of 490 fleet of 600 trireme vessels, sent by King Darius I and commanded by BC a Persian his experienced Median admiral Datis, set out from Ionia with an army of 25,000 men—light infantry, cavalry and archers—bound for...