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Military History

Land, naval & air warfare from ancient times to the late 20th century. Military History is the nation’s oldest and most popular magazine devoted to the history of warfare. Each issue contains incisive accounts from top writers and historians who take a fresh look at the commanders, campaigns, battles, and weapons that made history.




  • Military History Magazine

    Frederick’s One Big Idea

    The Prussian king strove for a well-ordered state—no matter the cost. We hardly know an instance of the strength and weakness of human nature so striking and so grotesque as the character of this haughty, vigilant, resolute, sagacious...

  • Military History Magazine

    Camouflage: You Know It When You See It

    From Khaki drab origins, camouflage has entered the realm of the invisible man.  Camouflage is baffling—not only to combatants, but also to those who wonder how, why and even whether it works. The history of military camouflage is...

  • Military History Magazine

    Marlborough at Blenheim

    The Battle of Blenheim was among the most decisive, and most complex, battles in European history. Fought on Aug. 13, 1704, during the war of War of Spanish Succession (1701–14)—in which allied powers including Austria, England and the...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned From Tannenberg, 1914

    The opening clash between the German and Russian empires in World War I ended in one of history’s most misleading outcomes. Germany’s war plan, accepting a two-front conflict against France and Russia, initially allowed only token...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: Finland’s White Death

    Simo Häyhä Finnish Army Order of the Cross of Liberty Finland 1940 The Russians called him “White Death.” During the 1939–40 Winter War, in the space of 100 days, Finnish sniper Simo Häyhä killed a confirmed 505 Russian soldiers...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Menin Gate, Ypres, Belgium

    Every day at 7:55 p.m. police in the small Belgian city of Ypres stop traffic on the Menin Road, one of the main thoroughfares into the ancient town. At exactly 8 o’clock a team of buglers from the Ypres volunteer fire brigade, in full...

  • Military History Magazine

    Rome Ravaged

    In 1527 the eternal city learned what happens when a leaderless, out-of-control army runs amok. It was not the metaphorical “fog of war” but actual fog that rolled up the Tiber River early on May 6, 1527, and it made all the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Grenada, 1983: Small Island, Big Lessons

    A three-day Cold War clash in the Caribbean had far-reaching impacts on American joint operations. Early on the morning of Oct. 23, 1983, a truck bomb detonated beside the U.S. Marine barracks at Lebanon’s Beirut International Airport,...

  • Military History Magazine

    Penicillin: Wonder Drug of World War II

    How mold in a petri dish became the soldiers’ lifesaver. In December 1943 British Prime Minister Winston Churchill was homeward bound across North Africa after a series of meetings with world leaders in the Middle East. He was 69 years...

  • Military History Magazine

    Making the Rules of War

    From ancient origins the informal rules of war have developed into a complex code designed to curb man’s lawless violence. But does it work? All’s fair in love and war. In love, perhaps—in war almost never. Despite the impression...

  • Military History Magazine

    Polk’s Mexican War

    The 1846–48 Mexican War redrew the political map of North America, effectively destroying Mexico as a powerful nation and bringing California and the Southwest into the United States. To many contemporaries the conflict seemed a...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned from the Battle of Taranto

    The 1940 British attack on the Italian naval base at Taranto had a significant impact on the early stages of World War II in the Mediterranean. It also had implications that went far beyond that time and place. Among Britain’s objectives...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: Breaking into Hell

    Witold Pilecki Polish Resistance Order of the White Eagle 1940–43 By 1920, 19-year-old Witold Pilecki had won the Polish Cross of Valor twice for action against the Red Army, and in World War II he commanded a cavalry platoon. After...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Route of the Lamed Hei, Israel

    Near the site where the Bible records David fighting the Philistine champion Goliath stands a monument to 35 Jewish fighters who died in a much more recent conflict. The Lamed Hei (the Hebrew numerals for 30 and five), as they are known,...

  • Military History Magazine

    The General Who Lost America?

    In the wake of its humiliation in the colonies, the British government found a ready scapegoat in General Sir Henry Clinton—but did he deserve the blame? On Sept. 15, 1776, five warships of the British Royal Navy anchored in the East...

  • Military History Magazine

    England’s Last Invasion

    The 1066 clash between Harold and William had revolutionary consequences for the island nation. For historians the year 1066 and the Battle of Hastings are inextricably linked, for that single day’s combat gave rise to what eventually...