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Military History Book Reviews


Military History Book Reviews


Book Review: Dark Invasion, 1915, by Howard Blum

HistoryNet Staff | Published: October 30, 2014 at 10:53 am
In his latest book, Dark Invasion, 1915, Howard Blum explores America's first brush with Homeland Security issues as it confronted German spies in the lead-up to the U.S. entry into World War I.

Book Review: Soldier Girls, by Helen Thorpe

HistoryNet Staff | Published: October 30, 2014 at 10:43 am
In Soldier Girls, Helen Thorpe traces the combat experiences of three female soldiers in recent conflicts in the Middle East to explore how war changes women.

Book Review: When Soldiers Fall, by Steven Casey

HistoryNet Staff | Published: October 30, 2014 at 10:33 am
In his study When Soldiers Fall, Steven Casey looks at the changing methodology and intent behind American military casualty reporting since World War I.

Book Review: The First World War in Colour, by Peter Walther

HistoryNet Staff | Published: October 30, 2014 at 10:24 am
The First World War in Colour, by Peter Walther, showcases 320 rare color images from a conflict more often imagined in black and white.

Book Review: The Lion’s Gate, by Steven Pressfield

HistoryNet Staff | Published: August 28, 2014 at 5:28 pm
Steven Pressfield steps out on a ledge with The Lion's Gate, his "hybrid history" of the Six-Day War, and the resulting narrative is vivid and impossible to set down.

Book Review: The Long Shadow, by David Reynolds

HistoryNet Staff | Published: August 28, 2014 at 5:19 pm
Cambridge professor David Reynolds has a look at World War I from his side of the Atlantic.

Book Review: 102 Days of War, by Yaniv Barzilai

HistoryNet Staff | Published: August 28, 2014 at 5:13 pm
Yaniv Barzilai, a State Department special rep during the 2001 invasion of Afghanistan, delivers a controversial account of those early days.

Book Review: Blücher, by Michael V. Leggiere

HistoryNet Staff | Published: August 28, 2014 at 5:04 pm
In his latest Napoleonic-era title Michael Leggiere profiles Prussian master commander Gebhard von Blücher.

Book Review: In the Hour of Victory, by Sam Willis

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 02, 2014 at 1:26 pm
Drawing on a newly discovered cache of period dispatches, Sam Willis looks anew on the turn-of-the-19th-century clashes that ushered in the "veritable golden age of British naval success."

Book Review: Alex's Wake, by Martin Goldsmith

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 02, 2014 at 1:16 pm
In this very personal history Martin Goldsmith retraces the ultimately futile flight of his grandfather, his uncle and their fellow European Jews from the far-reaching grasp of Nazi persecution during the Holocaust.

Book Review: The Most Dangerous Man in America, by Mark Perry

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 02, 2014 at 12:56 pm
Mark Perry reexamines the life and career of General Douglas MacArthur, among the best known -- and controversial -- American military leaders.

Book Review: Für Volk and Führer, by Erwin Bartmann

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 02, 2014 at 12:39 pm
The late German Corporal Erwin Bartmann's memoir of service with one of the initial units of the wartime Waffen-SS offers an instructive glimpse into the heart of the Nazi war machine.

Book Review: The Lost Book of Alexander the Great, by Andrew Young

HistoryNet Staff | Published: July 02, 2014 at 12:27 pm
Through "literary forensics" Andrew Young seeks to re-create Ptolemy's lost history of Alexander the Great, an ultimately impossible task.

Book Review: The D-Day Atlas, by Charles Messenger

HistoryNet Staff | Published: April 30, 2014 at 12:26 pm
Reissued in paperback for the 70th anniversary of the Normany Invasion, Charles Messenger's D-Day Atlas is the authoritative summary of all things related to the operation, with succinct text, ample photos and comprehensive maps.

Book Review: Hundred Days, by Nick Lloyd

HistoryNet Staff | Published: April 30, 2014 at 12:17 pm
Historian Nick Lloyd reexamines the closing days of World War I, examining the root causes of the shift in the Allies' favor.

Book Review: Hanns and Rudolf, by Thomas Harding

HistoryNet Staff | Published: April 30, 2014 at 12:06 pm
This dual biography by Thomas Harding profiles Rudolf Höss, the wartime Kommandant of Auschwitz concentration camp, and Hanns Alexander, the Jewish leader of the British intelligence unit tasked with tracking down Nazis, including Hoss.
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