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Military History Magazine




  • Military History Magazine

    The French Resistance: How Resistant?

    The only thing irresistible about the World War II French Resistance was Hollywood’s romanticizing of the small, secret, disorganized, movement. Blame Ernest Hemingway. Ever since he wrote For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940), the popular...

  • Military History Magazine

    1812: Victory at Sea

    One clear winner in a murky war was the new—and overmatched—U.S. Navy. Late on the afternoon of June 22, 1807, the 36-gun frigate USS Chesapeake cleared Virginia’s Hampton Roads and entered international waters. Outbound for the...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Making of Rommel

    How a 26-year-old lieutenant, fighting at Caporetto in the Italian Alps in 1917, became the legendary Rommel. Just after midnight on Oct. 24, 1917, it began to rain in Italy’s Isonzo River valley. Conditions were wet, dark and...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: Britain’s American Hero

    Ordinary Seaman William Seeley Royal Navy Victoria Cross Shimonoseki, Japan September 6, 1864 In the 155 years since it was instituted by royal warrant, the Victoria Cross —Britain’s highest military honor for valor in battle—has...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from the Moro Rebellion

    While the Moro Rebellion lasted roughly from 1903 to 1913, it’s perhaps more accurate to describe the insurgency by Muslim southern Filipinos—dubbed Moros by the Spanish—as a 600-year struggle for religious autonomy and independence...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: Morristown, New Jersey

    Although the 1777–78 winter encampment at Valley Forge, Pa., is firmly fixed in Americans’ collective memory, the situation at Morristown two years later was far bleaker. The Army’s inexperience with winter encampments, hut...

  • Military History Magazine

    From Cowardice to Courage

    For abandoning his post at Bunker Hill, Captain John Callender was court-martialed and cashiered—but he refused to remain a coward. O June 17, 1775, was a mixed bag at best for the Continental Army, which Congress had officially...

  • Military History Magazine

    Soviet Women at War

    Eager to prove themselves, women served the Red Army as nurses, medics, cooks and clerks—but also as snipers, surgeons, pilots and machine gunners. On June 21, 1941, the day before Nazi Germany sprang its surprise invasion of the Soviet...

  • Military History Magazine

    Buddha: Enlightened Warrior

    In his youth Siddhartha Gautama was a brawny, six-foot warrior prince, trained in the art of war—and perhaps touched by tragedy. It is a curious fact of military history that the founders of three of the world’s four major religions...

  • Military History Magazine

    What Ever Happened to the French Foreign Legion?

    Conceived in fear and mistrust, this fighting force of unmanageable misfits and deserters survived, thrived and earned its country’s grudging respect. Time was, films about the French Foreign Legion were themselves legion. P.C. Wren’s...

  • Military History Magazine

    Valor: The Cliff-Scaling Captain

    Hiram Bearss U.S. Marine Corps Medal of Honor The Philippines November 17, 1901 Hiram Bearss earned his first major decoration, the Medal of Honor, in the Philippines for leading his men down booby-trapped jungle trails, across a tropical...

  • Military History Magazine

    What We Learned: from Mount Gilboa, 1006 BC

    The Israelite victory at Michmash Pass (1010 BC) sparked a popular uprising that ejected Philistine outposts from the Israelite hill country. Saul’s control of the foothills thwarted outright frontal assaults, so Philistine commanders...

  • Military History Magazine

    Hallowed Ground: The Kahlenberg, Vienna

    The Ottoman Turks gained their first foothold in Europe at Gallipoli in 1354. In 1529 they reached Vienna and almost took the capital of the Habsburg Empire. They made a second attempt in 1683 and would have succeeded if not for the...

  • Military History Magazine

    Kublai Khan vs. Kamikaze

    When the legendary Mongol conqueror sought to invade Japan, he didn’t expect defeat to arrive with the wind. For more than a decade maritime archaeologists working in the murky waters off Takashima Island on Japan’s Kyushu coast have...

  • Military History Magazine

    When the Warriors Stood Down

    Patton, Truscott and the secret intrigues of postwar Europe. On May 8, 1945, the day the Third Reich fell to Allied forces, the devastation in Germany was all but complete. Cities, towns, railroads and ports lay in ruins. Schools, courts,...

  • Military History Magazine

    The Best Medicine

    Death came slowly to soldiers wounded on the battlefields of antiquity. The muscle-powered weapons that hacked at their flesh only rarely inflicted sudden death. Bodies pierced by spears or slashed by swords lingered in agony, sometimes...