MHQ Archives | Page 4 of 38 | HistoryNet MENU

MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    Mr. Gatling’s Game-Changing Gun

    Conceived as a peacemaker, the inventor’s weapon ushered in an era of mechanized killing. Rumors raged. In ex- cited whispers, in idle conversations that filled the nervous hours be- tween battles, soldiers on both sides of the American...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Heroes in Coats, Breeches, and Cock’d Hats

    In The Death of General Wolfe, Benjamin West combined elements of national pride, historical accuracy, and Christian iconography to create a new image of the heroic. On September 13, 1759, British Maj. Gen. James Wolfe and his men drifted...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Revolution’s Band of Brothers

    Whether heroes or opportunists, the O’Brien family of privateers helped America launch its battle for independence. It was an unlikely setting for one of the American Revolution’s most celebrated naval engagements: a hamlet in a remote...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Julian’s Gamble in the Desert

    Inspired by Alexander the Great, the Roman emperor set out to conquer Persia with a massive army, a bold plan, and a thirst for glory. One day in early April, stood on an earthen mound and looked out upon a magnificent array of military...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Battle of Tenaru River

    A marine recalls the first major battle on Guadalcanal. On August 7, 1942, Pfc. Robert “Lucky” Leckie and the 1st Marine Division stormed ashore at Guadalcanal only to find that the Japanese had abandoned the beaches and holed up...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Persistent Myths of Guernica

    After a Spanish town was bombed in 1937, overheated—and inaccurate—accounts of civilian deaths shook the world. On April 26, 1937, in the midst of the Spanish Civil War, German war – planes bombed Guernica, the ancient Basque...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms and Men: Simple but Deadly

    In the century before guns, the longbow brought a lethal efficiency to medieval warfare and gave England an early advantage in the Hundred Years’ War. In July 1333, Edward III stood at Halidon Hill, on the English border of Scotland,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Letters from Readers- Summer 2010

    Civil Rights Movement Should Never Be Called Insurgency Professor Mark Grimsley’s article “Why the Civil Rights Movement Was an Insurgency” (Spring 2010) introduces many readers to facts about the civil rights movement that lie...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Happy Birthday, Mein Führer

    On Hitler’s 50th, adoring Germans hailed their leader for making their country a great power again—and for stopping short of the all-out war they so feared. Adolf Hitler rose unusually early on the morning of Thursday, April 20, 1939,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Blinded by Hope

    Time and again, America marches into battle confident of easy victory— only to find that war really is hell. At a dinner party not too long ago, I met a prominent newsman who, during a conversation about America’s 2003 invasion of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms and Men: Returning Fire

    Led by a Nobel laureate, British gunners in World War I mastered the science of pinpointing— and knocking out—enemy artillery. By all accounts, the British artillery bombardment that pounded German positions prior to the 1916 Battle of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Letters from Readers- Autumn 2010

    Twisting Words on Torture I would not expect Stephen Budiansky to agree with much of anything in my book The Father of Us All, but I would hope him to be intellectually honest in his critique. That was not the case with his review Summer...

  • MHQ Magazine

    1939 Polish Cavalry vs. German Panzers

    The real story is far more interesting than the enduring Nazi-promulgated myth. On September 1, 1939, German land, air, and sea units struck targets all across Poland. Although it was not a surprise attack, the speed and level of violence...

  • MHQ Magazine

    To Catch a Traitor

    Recruited by George Washington to kidnap the turncoat Benedict Arnold, John Champe had to join the British himself to trap his man. On September 25, 1780, George Washington was scheduled to inspect West Point with Major General Benedict...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Shooting Down a Legend

    Despite its enduring fame, the Red Baron’s slow, crash-prone Fokker triplane was no great fighting machine. High over La Neuville airfield in occupied France, October 30, 1917, a lone Fokker triplane soared through the late afternoon...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Everyman’s Gun- The AK-47

    How Cold War politics made the AK-47 the world’s most ubiquitous gun. Plus—Fidel, Saddam, and the history of automatic weapons. One weapon alone has been a consistent presence in modern war: the infantry rifle. Tanks can rout...