MHQ Archives | Page 3 of 38 | HistoryNet MENU

MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    Citizen Tyrants

    Athenian generals, elected to their positions, found that appeasing citizen overlords can spell disaster in the field. The Sicilian expedition of 415–413 BC proved disastrous for the Athenians. They had undertaken the venture during what...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Emperor’s Tipping Point

    Forget Waterloo: Napoleon’s decline was clearly signaled by his failures at the Battle of Eylau eight years earlier. Poland, February 8, 1807. In the midst of a blizzard, Napoleon I, emperor of France, stands in the steeple of a church...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Silent Sentries

    An effective means of defense or of rendering territory impassable, land mines have always had one major drawback: they kill indiscriminately. “The enemy has discovered a new system of annoyance…a series of devices let into the ground...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Letters from the Readers- Autumn 2009

    An Earlier ‘Deadline’ First off, I want to say how much I enjoy the “Fighting Words” column in your magazine. Knowing the origins of words and phrases is fascinating and does provide much insight, understanding, and even humor when...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Peltasts: The Other Greek Warriors

    On ancient battlefields formerly dominated by heavily armed, well-protected hoplites, a once scorned class of fighting man changed the face of warfare. The prevailing image of ancient Greek warfare typically involves tight formations of...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Book Review: Tonight We Die as Men

    Tonight We Die as Men: The Untold Story of the Third Battalion 506 Parachute Infantry Regiment from Toccoa to D-Day By Ian Gardner and Roger Day. 344 pp. Osprey, 2009 $27.95 What more could possibly be said about the 101st Airborne...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Tank Versus Panzer

    The first tank battle signaled the beginning of a new era of modern warfare centered on firepower, protection, and mobility. Dense fog shrouded the area around the French villages of Villers- Bretonneux and Cachy, made even thicker by...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Taking a King’s Crown

    Parliament’s modern army faces off against the Royalists at Naseby in 1645. The English summer of 1645 had been unusually wet, but on June 14 the sky was clear and visibility excellent, making for a dramatic spectacle as two 17th-century...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The War-Torn History of the Bayeux Tapestry

    A timeless tale of William the Conqueror’s Norman invasion of England, in colored yarn. Associated with such bellicose figures as William the Conqueror, Napoleon Bonaparte, and Heinrich Himmler, it is surprising that the delicate fabric...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Getting Away With Murder

    Lost in the political scheming and gamesmanship that characterized the Union’s war in the West was the cold-blooded killing of one Union general by another in 1862. After Fort Sumter surrendered to Confederate batteries and the American...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Steuben Comes to America

    A Prussian captain’s discipline and vast military experience have had a lasting influence on the army of the United States. On February 24, 1778, Capt. Gen. George Washington, commander in chief of the Continental Army, rode out from the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Dead on Arrival

    While Hitler concluded that the airborne invasion of Crete was far too costly, it spurred the U.S. Army to create an entire American parachute corps. Corporal Hans Kreindler knew something was wrong. His transport had approached the island...

  • MHQ Magazine

    A ‘Band of Demons’ Fights for Texas

    Using a brilliant artillery tactic, Zachary Taylor drove the Mexicans into the Rio Grande in the opening battles of the Mexican-American War. On the northern edge of modern Brownsville, Texas, lie the battlefields of Palo Alto and Resaca...

  • MHQ Magazine

    What We Think About When We Think About Waterloo

    A British military historian views the epic battle through the prisms of time and nationality. It seems appropriate that the standard British image of Waterloo is of fortitude, the fortitude of soldiers in line and square resisting French...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Mannerheim Draws Lines in the Snow

    A former Russian cavalry officer helped Finland win independence, then saved it from Stalin and Hitler. On a pedestal across from the Central Post Office in Helsinki stands an imposing equestrian statue of Marshal Carl Gustav Emil...

  • MHQ Magazine

    1914: Marne in the Balance

    France very nearly failed to repulse Germany’s mammoth initial invasion. But it did, leading to a slaughterous long-term war of attrition. The Battle of the Marne was a close-run thing. It confirmed the elder Helmuth von Moltke’s...