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MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    Catch Me If You Can

    How a crafty German admiral led the Royal Navy on a wild chase across the Mediterranean and changed the balance of power in the First World War. Almost a year into World War I, American diplomat Lewis Einstein met Wilhelm Souchon, a rear...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Did FDR Doom Us to a Longer War?

    He sided with Churchill. He ignored his military advisers. As commander in chief of the United States during World War II, President Franklin D. Roosevelt seized the controls of America’s war-making apparatus more firmly than any...

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    The 27-Day War

    Just a month after 9/11 a handful of CIA men and U.S. Special Forces soldiers in Afghanistan—backed by cavalry, cash, and airstrikes—toppled the Taliban. At dusk on September 19, 2001, eight days after al-Qaeda’s 9/11 attack claimed...

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    The Fireball at Zonchio

    A ferocious battle with the Turks marked the end of Venice’s sea power. On October 31, 1498, a Venetian merchant, Andrea Gritti, wrote home from the Ottoman capital of Constantinople: “I can’t tell you more about business and...

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    MHQ Letters from Readers- Spring 2012

    Gentlemen, Choose Your Weapons I’m surprised that Chris McNab did not include the machine gun in “The Six Most Influential Weapons in History” Winter 2012. A lot of weapons were developed or tested in World War I, including poison...

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    MHQ Artists Review: Victory at What Cost?

    Daniel Maclise’s murals of Waterloo and Trafalgar dramatically illustrate the sacrifices of war. For nearly 150 years, British politicians have filed past two massive murals lining the walls of the Royal Gallery in the Houses of...

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    The Greatest Ancient Leader

    When Theodore Ayrault Dodge, the American Civil War historian known for his love of the ancient generals, dubbed Alexander, Hannibal, and Caesar “great captains” in 1889, imperial ambition was some- thing to be admired. Today, after...

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    Clearing the Fog of War

    In the late 1800s, countries raced to make smokeless gunpowder. The result changed the face of battle. The story of smokeless gunpowder begins in Switzerland, in the impeccable kitchen of Frau Schönbein. One fateful day in 1845, her...

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    Through a Lens Darkly

    A photographer in North Africa found that survival mattered more than great images. On November 10, 1941, 36-year-old Croswell Bowen boarded a ship headed for war. Pearl Harbor and the U.S. entry into World War II were still weeks away,...

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    MHQ Letters from Readers- Summer 2012

    In Defense of FDR Thank you for Joseph E. Persico’s excellent article “Did Roosevelt Doom Us to a Longer War?” Spring 2012. In all the “what ifs” of World War II, the timing of the Allied invasion of France still generates...

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    Napoleon’s Desert Storm

    Why Western armies win battles— but not wars—in the Muslim world. Crimson and azure robes embroidered with silver and gold flashed in the hot Egyptian sun as 7,000 Mamluk cavalry trotted toward the invaders, Napoleon Bonaparte’s Army...

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    Behind the Lines: Born of Blood and Compassion

    A witness to the carnage of a Crimean War battle founds the Red Cross. Sometime during the sweltering day of June 24, 1859, Jean Henri Dunant inadvertently stumbled into the crevasse of horror created by one of the great battles of the...

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    Experience: Life on an Ironclad

    A Union sailor’s letters describe his posting at Richmond’s naval front and the Confederacy’s final days. The story of the common soldier in the American Civil War is well known. Less familiar are narratives of the common sailor’s...

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    Unknown Soldier: Georgia’s Renaissance Man

    A boy king vanquished the Turks and ushered in a golden age. In the late 11th century, the European nation-state of Georgia was on the brink of annihilation. Over the previous century Seljuk Turks had invaded and annexed much of the...

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    Failure is Not an Option

    George C. Marshall ruthlessly purged the ranks of his generals and set an enduring standard for what it takes to lead U.S. troops. WORLD WAR II BEGAN with a series of dismissals across the top ranks of the U.S. military. Less than two...

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    Until They Are Home: The Work of JPAC

    Decades after Carlson’s Raiders stormed Makin Island, an elite team of forensic sleuths found the remains of the Marines who died there. IT WAS WINDY AND RAINY, and Christmas was fast approaching on that day in 1999 when Hugh Thomason...