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MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    6 Questions | Author Gerald Steinacher

    GERALD STEINACHER is an associate professor of history and the the Hymen Rosenberg Professor of Judaic Studies at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. He is the author of numerous publications on German and Italian 20th-century history,...

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    6 Questions | Author Cate Lineberry

    CATE LINEBERRY is the author of Be Free or Die: The Amazing Story of Robert Smalls’ Escape from Slavery to Union Hero, which will be published in June by St. Martin’s Press. She is the author of The Secret Rescue: An...

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    6 Questions | Author Christopher Kelly

    CHRISTOPHER KELLY was born in Sacramento, California, and earned a bachelor’s degree in philosophy from University of California, Berkeley, in 1981. He worked for nearly 20 years in the television industry, mainly on the West...

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    6 Questions | Author Mungo Melvin

    MAJOR GENERAL MUNGO MELVIN is a retired senior British Army officer with considerable experience in the analysis of operations and joint professional military education. He saw operational service in Northern Ireland, the Middle East, and...

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    6 Questions | Author Paul Starobin

    PAUL STAROBIN is a frequent contributor to the Atlantic and New Republic and was the Moscow bureau chief for Business Week. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal,...

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    Doomsday on Wheels

    The U.S. Army’s unique, 85-ton artillery launcher could certainly shoot, but could it really scoot? CAMP DESERT ROCK, in the Frenchman Flat area of the Nevada Test Site, was warm and bustling with activity when dawn broke on May 25,...

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    Exhausting Possibilities: Jean-Antoine Watteau

    A painter launches his career with novel portrayals of Louis XIV’s war-weary soldiers. Jean-Antoine Watteau is famous today for his fêtes galantes: small paintings of stylized clowns, musicians, actors, and flirtatious lovers set in...

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    Saboteurs at Work

    Special operations are never as slick as Hollywood suggests, but sometimes—despite huge obstacles and high risks—they work. “This student gave a remarkably satisfactory performance,” the instructor wrote. “At every point he...

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    Emperor Vs. Pirate: Tunis 1535

    Suleiman’s proxy, pirate Khair ad-Din “Barbarossa,” bet that he could defend Tunis against Charles V’s massive invasion force. He was mistaken. In the winter of 1533–1534, hundreds of skilled craftsmen filled the shipyards and...

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    Death Boards the Essex

    U.S. Navy captain David Porter bore the elements of greatness—but his epic 1812 Pacific voyage led to a Shakespearean final act. At age 32 in 1812, David Porter Jr., the son of a Revolutionary War seafarer, was a proud, ambitious man in...

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    Lincoln’s Choice: The Dakota War

    In the midst of the Civil War, President Lincoln personally decided who among 303 convicted Dakota warriors would hang. As the sun rose over Mankato, Minnesota, on the morning of the day after Christmas 1862, a door guard allowed a small...

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    Behind the Lines: Scuttled at Scapa Flow, 1919

    The final cruise of the German High Seas Fleet. It was 9:30 a.m. when the German High Seas Fleet came sweeping out of the morning fog lying low over the North Sea. Ahead of them lay Scotland’s Firth of Forth. Overhead, the smoke from 70...

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    Unknown Soldier: Being There

    British military engineer John Montrésor somehow found himself in the thick of things whenever history was made in 18th-century America. On February 20, 1760, near the height of the French and Indian War, a band of British Rangers...

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    MHQ Winter 2014- Comments

    U.S. Forests Fair Game in WWII Bill Yenne’s well-done though rather too concise article “When Japan Bombed Oregon,” Autumn 2013 on the September 1942 Japanese bombing of the mainland United States requires some commentary. First, a...

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    Mid-Atlantic Brawl

    Halloween 1943: A no-holds-barred fight breaks out between crews of USS Borie (DD-215) and U-405, with weapons from torpedoes to tommy guns. For most of the World War II Battle for the North Atlantic, sailors on outmoded U.S. Navy...

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    The Loneliness of the Military Historian

    The Loneliness of the Military Historian By Margaret Atwood   Confess: it’s my profession that alarms you. This is why few people ask me to dinner, though Lord knows I don’t go out of my way to be scary. I wear dresses of sensible...