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MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    Behind the Lines: The Durham Boat

    Originally built to carry heavy cargo on colonial waterways, Durham boats became General George Washington’s landing craft of choice in late 1776. For the most renowned river crossing in American history— General George Washington’s...

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    Laws of War: Uniting a Fractious Greece

    Philip II, in his 20s when he ascended the throne of Macedon in 359 B.C., had ambitious ideas for his backward realm at the edge of the feuding city-states of Greece. Under his rule, Macedonian nobles grew richer and understood that the...

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    Letters from Readers- MHQ Winter 2015

    Outmoded New Model Jim Lacey and Sharon Tosi Lacey’s article on Oliver Cromwell “The Curse of Cromwell,” Autumn 2014 helped flesh out the man, but King Charles II had other reasons for disbanding the New Model Army than simple...

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    Surgery in the Front Lines

    Starting in World War I, military hospitals moved closer and closer to bullets-flying combat, culminating in the legendary Korean War MASH units. Two years before the United States declared war on Germany, in 1915, a few American...

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    Retreat From Hsuchow, May 1938

    Jack Belden, now forgotten, was once famous during and after World War II as a war correspondent, whose vivid firsthand reporting from China, Burma, India, North Africa, Sicily, and Italy graced the dispatches from United Press and then...

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    Making Art of Atrocity

     In the wake of World War I, American artist George Bellows “had to draw them”—the works in his War Series. The swift advance of German armies through Belgium and northern France in the opening weeks of the First World War...

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    Hindman’s War: A Confederate long shot in Arkansas

    To turn around a famous Lincoln phrase, the Mississippi in 1862 was a vexed river. Union passage was blocked by the Southern fortress cities of Vicksburg and Port Hud- son, which in turn relied on standing armies covering both sides of the...

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    Clausewitz at War

    The Prussian military theoretician was combat tested in the Napoleonic Wars. Carl von Clausewitz’s major book, On War, published in 1832, remains the indispensable work on military theory and strategy, and he is respected worldwide as a...

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    The Man Behind the Rodman Gun

    The Rodman gun, developed in the mid-19th century, was the technological apex of smoothbore, muzzle-loading artillery. Cannons using chemical explosives to propel a projectile had made their first appearance on the battlefield in the 14th...

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    A Clumsy War, A Lasting Peace: The Treaty of Ghent

    The Treaty of Ghent, skillfully negotiated in 1814 by John Quincy Adams (center), ended the War of 1812 with Britain, preserved American rights and territories, and opened the West to expansion. During the more than two decades of almost...

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    This Terrible Truth: The Defense of Stalingrad

    Vasily Grossman (1905–1964), chronicler of the Eastern Front from 1941 to 1945, correspondent for Krasnaya Zvezda (Red Star), the Soviet army newspaper, was one of the finest reporters of World War II. An educated Jew from Ukraine who...

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    Mills Bomb: Trench Terror

    The Mills bomb, officially called the No. 5 hand grenade, is one of the most iconic weapons of the 20th century. Named after its British inventor, William Mills, who drew inspiration from the Belgian Roland grenade (1912), the bomb was...

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    Cold War Armageddon’s Dubious Arsenal

    Marc G. DeSantis discusses some of the strangest and most controversial nuclear weapons programs of the 20th century. M28/M29 Davy Crockett These man-portable recoilless rifles were designed to launch the 51-pound W54 atomic warhead, the...

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    Letters from Readers- MHQ Spring 2015

    War and Evolution Wayne Lee’s excellent article on the origins of warfare was both intellectually stimulating and a little disquieting for what was omitted and for how things were worded. I drew back my breath when I read Mr. Lee’s...

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    Behind the Lines | Antwerp, 1914

    Britain goes to war—but where?   WHOEVER CONTROLLED THE ENGLISH CHANNEL and whoever controlled the Channel threatened the maritime perimeter of the British Isles. That was the center of gravity in the United Kingdom’s national...

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    Breaking the Gustav Line

    In 1943 General Alphonse Juin and his Corps Expéditionnaire Français showed the Allies how to win a fight in the mountains...