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MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    Laos: The Road to Vietnam

    In 1959 the United States was drawn inexorably into a local conflict in a tiny Asian kingdom, relying on secret armies, Cold War tactics, and a vast underestimation of the enemy. Sound familiar? Almost 60,000 Americans died in the Vietnam...

  • MHQ Magazine

    England by Sea, Land, and Air

    A young U.S. Marine lieutenant survived a perilous 1943 sea journey to get a taste of wartime England and bone up on a newfangled technology called radar. In 1943 I was a newly minted first lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps and a...

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    Ask MHQ: German U-boats on the Shore

    Q: In addition to attacking shipping, why didn’t German U-boats surface and shell military or civilian targets on shore? James Goodwin Lake Ridge, Va. A: German and Japanese submarines did halfheartedly attack American land targets....

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    MHQ Letters from Readers- Summer 2009

    Naming Names in 1812 I have to question the use of the term “Republican” to describe the U.S. congressional majority party of 1812, more commonly called the Democratic-Republicans in Stephen Budiansky’s “Giant Killer,” Spring...

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    MHQ Book Review: The White War

    The White War: Life and Death on the Italian Front, 1915–1919  By Mark Thompson. 454 pp. Basic Books, 2009 $35.00  “The First World War is a mystery,” writes historian John Keegan. “Why did a prosperous continent, at the...

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    MHQ Book Review: The Gamble

    The Gamble: General David Petraeus and the American Military Adventure in Iraq, 2006–2008  By Thomas Ricks. 394 pp. Penguin Press, 2009 $27.95 In 2006, Thomas Ricks, a reporter for The Washington Post, published Fiasco, a scathing...

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    Artists at War: Women in War

    Western art of the last 500 years illustrates the diverse roles women have played in times of conflict. The modern idea of women in war conjures images of combat, with women serving and sometimes dying in an arena long considered the sole...

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    Reinventing the Battlefield

    America’s Civil War featured heavy rifle fire and entrenched combatants while the cavalry and artillery played subordinate roles. Battle was the defining characteristic of the American Civil War. Some authorities count as many as 10,000...

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    Burning Falmouth

    In 1775, the Royal Navy’s cruel attack backfired, spurring on the American colonies’ nascent rebellion. By the autumn of 1775, the six-month- old American Revolution had already devolved into a stalemate, at least on land. Maj. Gen....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Gall’s Last Stand

    The Lakota Sioux chief earned his reputation as a fierce warrior and tactical genius at Killdeer Mountain, the battles of the Yellowstone, and Little Bighorn. But what role, if any, did he really play in Custer’s final act? On June 25,...

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    Reaching for the Sky

    After breaking records and gender barriers in the Luftwaffe, two female pilots compete to change history—one to ensure Hitler’s success, the other his doom. Controversy stalked the 1936 Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. Germany had...

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    Citizen Tyrants

    Athenian generals, elected to their positions, found that appeasing citizen overlords can spell disaster in the field. The Sicilian expedition of 415–413 BC proved disastrous for the Athenians. They had undertaken the venture during what...

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    The Emperor’s Tipping Point

    Forget Waterloo: Napoleon’s decline was clearly signaled by his failures at the Battle of Eylau eight years earlier. Poland, February 8, 1807. In the midst of a blizzard, Napoleon I, emperor of France, stands in the steeple of a church...

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    Silent Sentries

    An effective means of defense or of rendering territory impassable, land mines have always had one major drawback: they kill indiscriminately. “The enemy has discovered a new system of annoyance…a series of devices let into the ground...

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    MHQ Letters from the Readers- Autumn 2009

    An Earlier ‘Deadline’ First off, I want to say how much I enjoy the “Fighting Words” column in your magazine. Knowing the origins of words and phrases is fascinating and does provide much insight, understanding, and even humor when...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Peltasts: The Other Greek Warriors

    On ancient battlefields formerly dominated by heavily armed, well-protected hoplites, a once scorned class of fighting man changed the face of warfare. The prevailing image of ancient Greek warfare typically involves tight formations of...