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MHQ

MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History takes you on an exciting journey to the world’s greatest battles and campaigns over the last 5,000 years, from ancient warfare through modern Iraq. Written by distinguished authors and historians who bring the world of history alive, the magazine covers in vivid detail the soldiers, leaders, tactics, and weapons throughout military history, and delivers it in an exquisitely illustrated, deluxe edition.




  • MHQ Magazine

    Revolution Unleashed

    In the 1950s, Algerian rebels fought the French for independence, losing nearly every battle, but winning the war. Glasses tinkled and voices rose and fell with laughter at the Milk-Bar, a soda shop in the European section of Algiers, the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Fooled Again

    A band of 57 Modoc warriors repeatedly outsmarted and outfought U.S. Army troops in California’s rugged high desert. On the cold, flint-gray morning of November 29, 1872, as sleet drummed the frozen earth, 37 troopers of Company B, 1st...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Play It Again, Putzi

    A piano-playing Nazi official charmed Hitler, then betrayed him to the United States. During the height of World War II, a longtime intimate of Adolf Hitler lived as a pampered prisoner on a Virginia plantation eight miles from the White...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Tactical Exercises: Art of the Siege

    A Byzantine emperor’s military manual describes how psychological warfare can break the will of the enemy. Leo VI, the Byzantine emperor from AD 886 to 912, was an extraordinary armchair general. Though he probably never set foot on the...

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    MHQ Letters from Readers- Summer 2011

    Who’s to Blame for the PT-109 Disaster? I HAVE BEEN WAITING almost 50 years for this article “War of Revenge,” Spring 2011. I was 13 when I first read an account of the sinking of the PT-109 and wrote a book report that said I...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Maccabees of St. Gall

    Ninth-century Benedictine monks created a beautifully illustrated account of the Jewish revolt of 174 BC. In the modern imagination, the medieval knight is a glamorous figure. No other warrior in Western history seems so admirable, so...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Death From Below

    In World War I, whole companies of men were assigned to burrow beneath enemy soldiers, then blow them sky high. They called themselves moles. Most were short, wiry men from the mines of Great Britain and Canada and Australia. Their special...

  • Military History Quarterly Magazine

    Why We Won’t Give Up Torture

    Some 150 years ago, Western armies all but abandoned torture. It has returned with a vengeance. In 1849, pacifists felt history was on their side. A series of idealistic revolutions had shaken autocratic regimes across Europe the previous...

  • Military History Quarterly Magazine

    Vietnam Letters from Readers- Autumn 2011

    Germany’s Plan Z in WWII: More Subs Needed? I read John M. Taylor’s “Raiders of the High Seas” Summer 2011 with interest, though I disagree with his conclusion that Germany before World War II should have invested more in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Artists on War: Revenge on Canvas

    A general mistreated by the enemy settles the score—and is immortalized in a painting that came to symbolize Britain’s domination of India. A few years after her husband died, the widow of Major General David Baird approached British...

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    Sea Change- Reinvention of the U.S. Navy

    How the U.S. Navy reinvented itself— and its sailors—during a century of radical change in technology and warfare. Navies, at first sight, appear to be highly traditional, even reactionary, organizations. The 21st-century U.S. Navy...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Marathon Men

    The conventional wisdom is that the Athenians at the Battle of Marathon were amateur soldiers who won by chance. In reality, they were the Israel Defense Force of their day—smart, highly trained, and merciless. Before dawn on September...

  • MHQ Magazine

    ‘A Moment Full of Peril’

    When John Brown seized Harpers Ferry and threatened to spark a slave insurrection, officials in Washington concluded only one man could stop him: Colonel Robert E. Lee. Depending on your source, John Brown’s 1859 Harpers Ferry raid was...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Experience of War: Morphine, Splints, and Hot Tea

    Early in World War I, a doctor follows a day of fierce fighting at the Marne with a long night caring for the wounded and dying. Arthur Anderson Martin, a small-town doctor from New Zealand, was attending a medical conference in England...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Arms and Men: Pump Up the Volume

    From trumpets at Jericho to Eminem at Fallujah, music and sound have been valuable weapons. Lieutenant Colonel Bill Kilgore leads his helicopter gunships in over the beach. Loudspeakers on the choppers blast Richard Wagner’s “The Ride...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Letters from Readers- Winter 2012

    Does Torture Work? I take issue with Colin Woodard’s one-sided conclusion in “Why We Won’t Give Up Torture” Autumn 2011—that it does not work. Discussing torture used in the war on terrorism, he cites only one source, CIA officer...