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Online Gallery: Battle for the West

MHQ’s Summer 2011 issue features “Battle for the West,” a special package of stories about clashes between the U.S. Army and American Indians after the Civil War.
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Building the Army of the Potomac

Stephen Sears writes of how the Army of the Potomac's politically appointed generals and short-term volunteer troops nearly unhinged Lincoln’s plans in 1861 to win the Civil War.
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The Truth About Devil Boats

During World War II, adroit navy public relations and obliging media coverage wrapped PT boats in glamour. Initially designed for dangerous nighttime attacks on much larger Japanese warships, the boats came to be seen as intrepid little heroes, America’s Davids taking on Japan’s Goliaths of the sea.
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The Kennedy Curse in World War II

Though John F. Kennedy emerged from World War II as a national hero, he thought of the war years as a dark period for his family. “It turned [us] upside down and sucked all the oxygen out of our smug and comfortable assumptions,” he said.
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Constitution vs. Guerrière: America’s Coming Out Party

In August 1812, Captain Isaac Hull in the American frigate Constitution dismasted the Royal Navy's Guerrière in a resounding victory that helped the U.S. Navy hold its own for nearly three years against the mightiest sea power on earth.
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Winston Churchill Gallery

"Come then, let us go forward together with our united strength." Winston Churchill - May 13, 1940
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Scandinavian Twist: Churchill’s 1940 Fiasco in Norway

In Norway in 1940, Hitler and Churchill gamble their careers and the futures of their respective countries. The campaign was a fiasco for Churchill, yet it propelled him into office and ensured Hitler would fail to turn back the D-Day invasion four years later.
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1939: Polish Cavalry vs. German Panzers

During the September Campaign in Poland in 1939, no mounted Polish cavalrymen ever charged at German tanks with lances, but their story is on of bravery and professionalism in the face of overwhelming odds, and it clearly indicates that far from being a military anachronism, the Polish lancer was a tough and dangerous adversary.
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Folly in the Philippines

On May 3, 1898, two days after Commodore George Dewey’s stunning defeat of the Spanish at Manila Bay, President William McKinley sent American troops to occupy the Philippines. At this early stage in the Spanish-American War, there was no plan for the occupation, including how long it would last or what ends the United States sought in those distant islands.