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  • MHQ Magazine

    The Battle of Algiers, Torture, and Marcel Bigeard

    IN LATE 1956 FRENCH AUTHORITIES concluded they had to stop the protests and terrorist bombings in Algiers. The 10th Parachute Division assumed civil and military powers in the Algerian capital and its paras set about destroying the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Revolution Unleashed

    In the 1950s, Algerian rebels fought the French for independence, losing nearly every battle, but winning the war. Glasses tinkled and voices rose and fell with laughter at the Milk-Bar, a soda shop in the European section of Algiers, the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Fooled Again

    A band of 57 Modoc warriors repeatedly outsmarted and outfought U.S. Army troops in California’s rugged high desert. On the cold, flint-gray morning of November 29, 1872, as sleet drummed the frozen earth, 37 troopers of Company B, 1st...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Play It Again, Putzi

    A piano-playing Nazi official charmed Hitler, then betrayed him to the United States. During the height of World War II, a longtime intimate of Adolf Hitler lived as a pampered prisoner on a Virginia plantation eight miles from the White...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Tactical Exercises: Art of the Siege

    A Byzantine emperor’s military manual describes how psychological warfare can break the will of the enemy. Leo VI, the Byzantine emperor from AD 886 to 912, was an extraordinary armchair general. Though he probably never set foot on the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    MHQ Letters from Readers- Summer 2011

    Who’s to Blame for the PT-109 Disaster? I HAVE BEEN WAITING almost 50 years for this article “War of Revenge,” Spring 2011. I was 13 when I first read an account of the sinking of the PT-109 and wrote a book report that said I...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The American Rommel

    Major General John Wood Showed Patton and the rest of the high command how to fight a true lightning war.   THE HISTORIC FRENCH TOWN OF TROYES CONTROLLED an important stretch of the upper Seine River, so it was a likely spot for the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Maccabees of St. Gall

    Ninth-century Benedictine monks created a beautifully illustrated account of the Jewish revolt of 174 BC. In the modern imagination, the medieval knight is a glamorous figure. No other warrior in Western history seems so admirable, so...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Death From Below

    In World War I, whole companies of men were assigned to burrow beneath enemy soldiers, then blow them sky high. They called themselves moles. Most were short, wiry men from the mines of Great Britain and Canada and Australia. Their special...

  • Military History Quarterly Magazine

    Why We Won’t Give Up Torture

    Some 150 years ago, Western armies all but abandoned torture. It has returned with a vengeance. In 1849, pacifists felt history was on their side. A series of idealistic revolutions had shaken autocratic regimes across Europe the previous...

  • Military History Quarterly Magazine

    Vietnam Letters from Readers- Autumn 2011

    Germany’s Plan Z in WWII: More Subs Needed? I read John M. Taylor’s “Raiders of the High Seas” Summer 2011 with interest, though I disagree with his conclusion that Germany before World War II should have invested more in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Midway Betrayal

    Who blew the secret behind the U.S. Navy’s victory at Midway—and why?...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Two Horsemen of the Revolution

    Casimir Pułaski and Michael Kováts, both immigrants, earned a place in history as “the fathers of the U.S. Cavalry"...

  • MHQ Magazine

    “Murderers of Koje-do!”

    In 1953, Communist POWs in a camp off the coast of South Korea proved that MacArthur was wrong: There is a substitute for victory.    FOR 40 YEARS OF THE COLD WAR, WHENEVER THE AMERICAN MILITARY actually fought a hot war of any...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | To Fight Another Day

    In 1913, after working as a correspondent for the Toronto Star during the Balkan Wars, Service—by then widely known as “The Bard of the Yukon”—moved to Paris. He was 41 when World War I broke out. Turned down for military service,...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Bulge

    When the Germans broke through in the Ardennes, one Eisenhower decision saved the day for the Allies. But another prevented them from achieving total victory...