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  • MHQ Magazine

    They Can’t Realize the Change Aviation Has Made

    Charles A. Lindbergh was convinced that the airplane gave the Nazis an unbeatable edge. His fears set the tone—and the terms—of the war debate in America...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Civil Warrior

    Through his pioneering histories of the Civil War, it was said, Bruce Catton “made us hear the sounds of battle and cherish peace.”   IN 1923 A YOUNG REPORTER FOR THE CLEVELAND PLAIND DEALER set out to interview Civil...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Miracle on the Vistula

    Józef Piłsudski saved Poland by handing the Red Army one of its greatest defeats ever.   IN EARLY 1920, IN THE WAKE OF WORLD WAR I, Europe was desolate and bankrupt. President Woodrow Wilson’s attempt to insert the United States...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Women, Combat, and the Gender Line

    A secret World War II study proved that female soldiers were ready to serve under fire. Other nations made warriors of their women. Why did we? WOMEN WERE THE INVISIBLE COMBATANTS OF World War II. Hundreds of thousands fought—not as...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Battle for Baikal

    In 1918 the Czecho-Slovak Legion found itself fighting the Red Army in Siberia for control of the world’s deepest lake.   ONE OF THE MOST SPECTACULAR YET LITTLE-KNOWN stories of World War I and the Russian Revolution is the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Plot to Kidnap Washington

    In 1780 two British military officers planned a mission that could have changed the course of history. In February 1780 Lieutenant General Wilhelm von Knyphausen, the interim commander in chief of British forces in the New York area, and...

  • MHQ Magazine

    D-Day Revisited

    The author, laden with oral-history transcripts, spent a summer in Normandy studying the battle that marked the beginning of the end of the war in Europe.   AS PART OF THE RESEARCH for a book I am writing about D-Day, timed for the...

  • MHQ Magazine

    D-Day Through a German Lens

    As the Allies prepared for the Normandy invasion, what was the enemy thinking? We’ve all had the unhappy experience: the guests who wouldn’t leave. They show up unexpectedly and you scramble to respond, whipping together whatever food...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Invasion of Cuba

    The greatest short-term mobilization since World War II took place during the missile crisis of 1962. The plans to take the island are revealed here for the first time.   Most published accounts and studies of the Cuban Missile Crisis...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Fertile Blood

    Medical progress, bought at the enormous cost of human lives, may be the most lasting and vital benefit of war.   “I am badly injured, Doctor; I fear I am dying… I think the wound in my shoulder is still bleeding.”...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Man Who Saved Korea

    Matthew B. Ridgway, who brought a beaten Eighth Army back from disaster in 1951, was a thinking—and fighting—man’s soldier.   IF YOU ASKED A GROUP OF AVERAGE AMERICANS to name the greatest American general of the twentieth...

  • HistoryNet Video

    Interview: Author James Morgan on the Battles of Ball’s Bluff and Edwards...

    Author James A. Morgan, III discusses his new book, A Little Short of Boats: The Battles of Ball’s Bluff & Edwards Ferry, October 21-22, 1861. ...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Outer Limits of Armor

    Eccentric solo inventor J. Walter Christie designed vehicles like no others. But his oddball designs influenced some of the 20th century’s best tanks. ...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Breaking the Gustav Line

    In 1943 General Alphonse Juin and his Corps Expéditionnaire Français showed the Allies how to win a fight in the mountains...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Over the Hump

    In 1942, the U.S. Army Air Forces’ brand-new Air Transport Command began running the most audacious airlift of World War II: flying “the Hump” over the foothills of the Himalayas   ON AUGUST 2, 1943, CBS WAR...

  • MHQ Magazine

    How Napoleon Lost Paris

    In early March 1814, Napoleon was outmaneuvered at Laon, France, by Field Marshal Gebhard von Blücher’s Allied army, leaving the capital city of Paris unprotected   IN EARLY NOVEMBER 1813, several weeks after his crushing defeat...