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MHQ Magazine




  • MHQ Magazine

    The Final Secret of the USS Scorpion

    In 1968 one of the U.S. Navy’s nuclear submarines went missing in the Atlantic. Now, 50 years later, the full story of its disappearance can finally be told...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Cannae

    On a hot, dusty field in 216 B.C., a Roman army perished and the dream of double envelopment was born...

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    Announcing! The 2018 Thomas Fleming Awards for Outstanding Military History Writing

    “Teddy,” my father once said to me, “become a lawyer, and I guarantee you’ll make a million bucks by the time you’re thirty. I remember looking him in the eye and saying, “Pop, I think I want to be a writer instead.”...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Classic Dispatches | The Lonely Grave

    Reuben Louis Goldberg—Rube Goldberg as the world knew him—did it all: He was an engineer, cartoonist, sculptor, author, inventor, and—for just a very brief time in 1919—a war correspondent. Born in San Francisco on July 4, 1883,...

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    Alexander in India

    The battle at the Edge of the Earth...

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    Artists | Propaganda with a Passion

    Dutch cartoonist Louis Raemaekers gained international fame with his anti-German cartoons during World War I. IN WORLD WAR I, BRITAIN TOOK THE UNPRECEDENTED STEP of enlisting artists and writers to work for its War Propaganda Bureau,...

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    The Athenian Century

    For the better part of a hundred years, Athens commanded an empire to be reckoned with. But the Parthenon and every other emblem of the polis's greatness rested on a watery foundation: the navy...

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    Musketgate

    The Civil War contracting scandal that took down a U.S. senator—and led to the passage of “Lincoln’s Law”...

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    Artists on War: War in Miniature

    The military heir to Genghis Khan ensured his legacy through the creation of detailed histories illustrated with small but splendid paintings. After Genghis Khan’s empire disintegrated in the 14th century, another brilliant and ruthless...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Unintended Revolution

    Mexico’s war of independence started out as a coup and ended—thanks to a charismatic priest—with the creation of a nation. On August 25, 1810, Francisco Xavier Venegas de Saavedra, New Spain’s recently appointed viceroy,...

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    How the French Won the American Revolution

    Decrepit ships, snarled signals, and indecision doomed the British at the Battle of the Virginia Capes and secured America’s independence. It is impossible to say who was more astounded that sunny morning of September 5, 1781, when...

  • MHQ Magazine

    FDR Writes a Policy in Blood

    FDR’s blind insistence on unconditional surrender prolonged World War II and cost hundreds of thousands of lives. From January 14 to January 24, 1943, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill met and argued amiably and com- promised...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Togo Ignites The Rising Sun 1904-1905

    Admiral Togo opens the door to the Rising Sun’s catastrophic era of militarism. On the evening of February 8, 1904, life in the Russian military encampment at Port Arthur was good. The commander of the Russian Far Eastern Fleet, Vice...

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    Amazons

    What has made the ancient mythology of warrior women so enduring? Does it have any basis in reality?...

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    MHQ Book Review: Wired for War

    Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict in the 21st Century By P.W. Singer. 499 pp. Penguin Press, 2009 $29.95 Droids locked and loaded, ready to take over the world. As P.W. Singer describes in his latest tome on modern...

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    MHQ Book Review: We Are Soldiers Still

    We Are Soldiers Still: A Journey Back to the Battlefields of Vietnam By Harold G. Moore and Joseph Galloway. 247 pp. HarperCollins, 2008 $24.95 Sometimes a book is so good that it cries out for a sequel. Such is the case for We Were...