MHQ Magazine Archives | Page 2 of 25 | HistoryNet MENU

MHQ Magazine




  • MHQ Magazine

    Massacre of the Innocents

    One of the enduring legends of the Great War, the singing attack of German students at the First Ypres is a curious mixture of fact and self-serving fiction–a cover-up that became a cornerstone of Nazi mythology. ...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Salonika

    The world’s biggest internment camp” was what German propagandists called the Allied positions around the Greek city of Salonika. A quarter-million British, French, African, Serb, and Greek troops spent so much time entrenching...

  • MHQ Magazine

    From ‘Belgian Rattlesnakes’ to BARs

    For nearly a century, the infantryman has been linked in the popular mind and battle doctrine with the sus­tained-fire machine gun. Whether it is a Wehrmacht soldier spraying Omaha Beach with an MG 42 or a U.S. Army Ranger rak­ing a...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Unreal City

    Think of the Western Front as a great metropolis, whose chief industry was not production but destruction. From 1914 until 1918 it was the largest city on earth...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Memories of A Devil Dog

    MHQ frequently receives unsolicited first-person accounts of veterans’ expe­rience of battle, and in March 2001 an unusual contribution immediately grabbed our attention. According to Laura Linn Wright‘s letter: “My...

  • MHQ Magazine

    A Bundle of Presumptions

    Military archaeology solves a literary mystery....

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Enduring Mystique of Cannae

    In February 1914, as his son prepared for the War Acade­my entrance examination, General Helmuth von Moltke (the younger) sent him a book and a word of advice: Study Cannae. The book was not an eyewitness account of the battle (though...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Oh! How He Hated to Get up in the Morning

    Few soldiers have matched Sergeant Irving Berlin's resourcefulness in beating reveille....

  • MHQ Magazine

    An Ace for the Czar

    Aviation pioneer Boris Sergievsky began his flying career in the World War I air battles over the Eastern Front....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Fateful Voyage of Lusitania

    The Cunard liner's captain expected a safe Atlantic crossing, but a German U-boat would bring Lusitania's journey to a devastating end...

  • MHQ Magazine

    John Singer Sargent Visits the Front

    The newly invented weapons that brought such death and horror to the battle fields of World War I also inspired some remarkable works of art, including John Singer Sargents haunting Gassed...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Breaking of Armies

    In 1917 the British mustered their resources for one last great offensive to break through German positions outside Ypres....

  • MHQ Magazine

    Reviews | Reaching Verdicts

    “Opportunity often comes disguised in the form of misfortune, or temporary defeat,” Napoleon wrote. Not Napoleon Bonaparte; Napoleon Hill, the American self-help author who vaul­ted to fame in 1927 with The Law of Success. In Adam...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Poetry | Heading My Way

    Brian Turner earned a master of fine arts in poetry from the University of Oregon before serving for seven years in the U.S. Army. He deployed to Bosnia-Herzegovina with the 10th Mountain Division in 1999–2000 and then spent a year in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    The Day the Earth Blew Open

    “Gentlemen, we may not make history tomorrow,” General Hubert Plumer reportedly told his staff, “but we shall certainly change the geography.” IN THE EARLY MORNING HOURS OF JUNE 7, 1917, ONE OF THE LARGEST NONNUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS in...

  • MHQ Magazine

    Laws of War | Cruel and Not Unusual

    In 1865 more than a dozen African-American volunteers in the Union army paid dearly for their role in “The Jacksonville Mutiny.”...